South West Public Health Speciality Training Programme Policy

Section A - The Public Health Specialty Training Programme

 Section B - The Organisation of the Training Programme

 Section C - Human Resources

 Appendix One

 Appendix Two

 

Section A - The Public Health Specialty Training Programme 

Introduction 

The South West Public Health Specialty Training Programme is organised by the Severn Postgraduate Medical Education on behalf of the whole region. It provides a combination of academic training, service experience and skills based training in public health.

A Reference Guide for Postgraduate Specialty Training in the UK, The Gold Guide, Fourth Edition, June 2010 sets out national arrangements for specialty training programmes for Specialty Registrars appointed since August 2007.

The Faculty of Public Health, (FPH) develops the General Medical Council, (GMC) approved curriculum that the training programme delivers. The current Public Health Specialty Training Curriculum, 2010 can be found on the training programme web-site.

Training is open to applicants from a range of disciplines provided the FPH eligibility criteria are met. All appointees are referred to as Specialty Registrars (StRs).

Full-time training for trainees in public health usually takes five years starting in August of each year. However for some individuals with specific prior experience or who have already completed a Masters in Public Health, this total training time may be reduced.

At the start of the first academic year of their training most trainees will begin studying for a Masters in Public Health (MSc or MPH). They will then spend the remainder of their training in at least two different training locations. During this time they will also prepare for their Faculty of Public Health membership examinations.

This Public Health Specialty Training Programme Policy describes the structure of possible training programmes for trainees in the South West. It includes arrangements for academic and educational supervision, provision of trainer development, information about training locations, induction programmes for new trainees, opportunities for external attachments, arrangements for rotation between training locations, study leave and performance assessment processes.

All Specialty Registrars and supervisors are expected to be fully conversant and work within this policy, the Gold Guide and the FPH curriculum.

What Is Public Health? 

Because of the wide range of organisations and disciplines that contribute to improving the health of the population, it can be difficult to reach a definition of ‘public health’ which everyone will feel comfortable with.

Sir Donald Acheson, in his report on the public health function in 1988 defined public health as “the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organised efforts of society”. This definition reflects the multi-disciplinary basis of public health practice, and recognises the broad public health responsibilities of a wide range of organisations, including central government and local authorities as well as the National Health Service and academic departments of public health, health policy, health promotion and environmental health.

(Source: Exploring Public Health Career Paths; Published by NHS Executive. Authors: Yvonne Cornish, Teri Knight & Janet Baker in association with Professor Rod Griffiths).

The training programme develops one group within the wider public health workforce – Public Health Specialists who will be appointable to Consultant grade posts.

Key Areas Of Public Health 

The Faculty of Public Health has identified nine key areas for public health practice across the three domains of public health (health protection, health improvement and service quality), as well as ethical and professional practice. These form the basis of all Faculty development of standards and provide the framework for the competencies which all trainees in public health should achieve during their training.

Nine Key Areas of Public Health

  1. Surveillance and assessment of the population’s health and well-being
  2. Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of health and healthcare interventions, programmes and services
  3. Policy and strategy development and implementation
  4. Strategic leadership and collaborative working for health
  5. Health Improvement
  6. Health Protection
  7. Health and Social Service Quality
  8. Public Health Intelligence
  9. Academic Public Health

Access To The Public Health Specialty Training Programme 

The South West Public Health Specialty Training Programme is an integrated programme for trainees in public health. Trainees are recruited from a wide range of professional backgrounds but must comply with the FPH required levels of experience and qualifications. The programme aims to provide equal opportunities and high quality training for generalist, health protection and academic training.

In addition, the programme offers placements to postgraduate medical trainees in the second year of their Foundation Programme (F2s).

Academic Lecturer posts, including National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded Academic Clinical Fellows, ACFs are recruited at local level but are expected to meet the required standard in the national assessment process before being given a formal offer of an ACF post.  They are appointed on three year contracts with the expectation of submitting a research fellowship at the end and taking time Out of Programme for Research (OOPR).  If Academic Clinical Fellows fail to gain a post-doctoral fellowship they can be converted to Service Registrars and continue to train as a Service Registrar with no academic time included in their contract provided they are successful in Part A and Part B examinations of the Faculty of Public Health Medicine and a satisfactory progression through ARCP (Annual Review of Competence Progression) at expected rate of 75% of time on a pro rata basis, during each year of training as required in the terms of their employment.   This policy also applies to ACF who have completed their OOPR and are returning to the training programme to complete their service training.

Lecturer posts allow trainees to develop their research or teaching skills alongside their public health training.

Trainees in dental public health are also supported with their programmes which are led by the Dental Deanery working in partnership with the Public Health training programme.

Aims And Objectives Of The Programme 

For Specialty Registrars

Aims

  • To equip trainees with the appropriate training to obtain a consultant or equivalent post in public health
  • To equip those in lecturer and academic posts with the appropriate training to obtain a substantive academic post in public health

Objectives

  • To provide up to five years training in public health
  • To support trainees in the acquisition of Membership of the Faculty of Public Health by examination
  • To achieve a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) on satisfactory completion of the training programme
  • To achieve registration as public health specialists on either the General Medical Council’s (GMC) Specialist Register or the UK Public Health Register

For Postgraduate Medical Trainees in Foundation Year 2 (F2s)

Aim

  • To provide F2 trainees with an introductory experience of public health

Objectives

  • To provide short term public health attachments, usually of four months duration
  • To provide sufficient, suitable experience for F2 trainees to gain an understanding of and gain practical skills and competencies in public health

For Specialty Registrars in Dental Public Health

To work with the Dental Deanery to achieve the following:

Aim

  • To equip trainees with the appropriate training to obtain a consultant or equivalent post in dental public health

Objectives

  • To provide up to five years training through the specialist registrar grade in dental public health
  • To support trainees in the acquisition of a formal academic qualification in dental public health at masters level or equivalent
  • To award all trainees a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) in dental public health on the satisfactory completion of the training programme
  • To see all trainees achieve registration as specialists in dental public health on the General Dental Council’s (GDC) Specialist Register

 

Section B - The Organisation of the Training Programme 

Training Timetable 

Overview

Training on the Public Health Specialty Training Programme consists of three phases of learning. These phases are defined by successful acquisition of learning outcomes defined for each phase, rather than by time. Movement to successive phases is dependent on success both in examination and in workplace-based assessment.

Phase One

During Phase One, most trainees will follow a course of academic study on an MSc or MPH programme. These studies will provide the basis of knowledge required for taking the Part A examinations of the Membership of the Faculty of Public Health (MFPH).

Trainees are expected to start their MSc/MPH programme in the September after joining the scheme and sit Part A in the June of the following calendar year.

Throughout this phase trainees will be based at their first training location and will return to this location when not attending university. During this time they will be exposed to varied public health experiences relevant to the Part A MFPH studies including shadowing members of the public health team.

Achievement of Phase One requires passing the Part A MFPH examination and achievement of Phase One learning outcomes.

Phase Two

Trainees will build on the knowledge base acquired in Phase One to develop basic competence in public health. Trainees will undertake clearly defined service work in increasingly complex settings.

Achievement of Phase Two requires passing the Part B MFPH examination and satisfactory assessment of Phase Two learning outcomes in the workplace.

During Phase 3 trainees will consolidate core skills in public health practice, have the opportunity to develop specific areas of interest and be encouraged to take up secondments to broaden their public health experience.

Achievement of Phase Three requires satisfactory assessment of learning outcomes in the workplace.

Timely progression through training

The FPH curriculum includes a diagram of the training pathway and timescales for phases one -three. Progression between phases is dependant upon both exam success and achievement of learning outcomes. The timing is not exact, but provides a useful indication of expected progression.

 

To achieve progress against the expectations for phase progression, parts A and B should be taken during the respective phases, not at the end. Accordingly the SW PH Specialty Training Programme expects:

StRs will aim to pass part A by the end of ST 1. This means there will still be time to resit if needed, before expected completion of all Phase One learning outcomes. Phase one is ideally completed by mid ST 2 year and no later than the end of ST2.

StRs will aim to pass part B during ST 2, with a view to all phase 2 outcomes having been achieved by mid-ST 3. This is midway through training for full time StRs on standard 5 yr training contracts. At the latest, phase 2 should be completed by the end of ST3.

Pro-rata adjustments must be made to these expectations for flexible working StRs.

Timing of Health Protection Attachment

Following Phase 1 and the successful completion of Part A MFPH, trainees must undertake an attachment to a health protection unit or consultant in communicable disease control (CCDC). This attachment is for a minimum of a three month period where they will be expected to acquire many of the public health skills required to deal with health protection issues. Following completion of the attachment, trainees will be assessed to ensure that they are competent to go on to the on-call rota. Guidance on the assessment of competence to start supervised on-call duties can be found on the Faculty website.

In some exceptional cases, trainees may apply to the Training Programme Director to join their local on-call rota prior to successful completion of Part A. They will need to provide evidence that they have been part of a rota within eighteen months of joining the programme and be assessed as competent by the relevant Director of Health Protection Unit in line with the Faculty’s assessment guidance.

Duration Of Training 

For Speciality Registrars, public health training is normally full-time for five years. Part-time training is proportionately longer. Training time may be reduced where applicants have previously completed a relevant masters qualification. Eligibility for a reduction in training time will be decided through individual assessment, (see appendix 1).

Academic Year 

The first year of training will usually be spent in academic study towards Part A of the membership examination of the Faculty of Public Health (MFPH), through undertaking an appropriate Masters in Public Health (MSc or MPH) course.

Arrangements for enrolling onto an academic course will need to be made by the trainee prior to the August start date of their first year on the programme.

It is expected that all Specialty Registrars will attend the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to complete the masters programme. Exceptions will be made for those wishing to study part-time or request attendance at a different masters course for well founded personal reasons. This will be agreed with the Training Programme Director once an offer of employment has been made.

Specialty Registrars who have met the criteria to have a shorter contract may be required to undertake some top up study in preparation for Part A. The nature of this and the relevant institution will be discussed with both Educational and Academic Supervisor’s and will be approved by the Training Programme Director, once an offer of employment has been made.

StRs having previously gained Part A and a Public Health masters qualification would not normally have an academic year.

Assessment 

Overview

Assessment during training incorporates:

  • workplace assessment of competence to do the job and
  • timely progression through the training programme, including achievement of MFPH.

Workplace based assessment – StRs and supervisors should work to the FPH curriculum.

The assessment of timely progression through the training programme is via the Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) or for trainees working to the pre 2007 curriculum, Record of In Training Assessment (RITA) process.

Examination

Membership to the Faculty of Public Health (MFPH) consists of the Part A and the Part B (OSPHE) examinations. Success in the Part A examination leads to Diplomate Membership of the Faculty. Success in the Part B examination leads to full Membership of the Faculty.

The Part A examination is intended to test candidates’ knowledge and understanding of the scientific bases of public health and covers a broad syllabus which is set out on the Faculty website. An MSc or MPH helps prepare the student for the examination. Trainees will also need to be able to apply this theoretical learning to a service situation.

Part B of the MFPH examination consists of an Objective Structured Public Health Examination (OSPHE). It is designed as a ‘show how’ assessment of the candidate's ability to apply relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes to the practice of public health. It tests the trainee’s ability to communicate effectively both verbally and non-verbally; assimilate and utilise relevant information; provide appropriate responses and judgements; handle challenges and manage conflict.

Annual Review

The assessment of satisfactory progress in the training programme is undertaken at an annual review via the ARCP or RITA process.

As detailed in section 7.50 of the Gold Guide, ‘The panel has two objectives:

  • to consider and approve the adequacy of the evidence and documentation provided by the trainee, which at a minimum must consist of a review of the trainee’s portfolio through a structured report from the educational supervisor, documenting assessments (as required by the specialty curriculum) and achievements. The panel should provide comment and feedback where applicable on the quality of the structured educational supervisor’s report or assessor’s documentation;
  • provided that adequate documentation has been presented, to make a judgement about the trainee’s suitability to progress to the next stage of training or confirm training has been satisfactorily been completed’.

All trainees must record evidence of their training progress in an individual Professional Learning Portfolio. The portfolio will include evidence to reflect the work completed by the trainee and the competencies that they have achieved. Trainees must demonstrate all of the public health competencies to a satisfactory standard by the end of their training programme. Each competency will require sign-off by their educational supervisor.

In compiling evidence on phase one learning outcomes, evidence arising from undertaking a MPH or equivalent course may be considered by the educational and academic supervisors. Taking account of how long ago the MPH was completed, they should advise the registrar on how they can demonstrate that the evidence is current rather than historical (showing what the registrar could do then, rather than now). A suitable workplace based assessment should be completed and recorded on an activity summary sheet to ensure that there is contemporary evidence of the learning outcome being achieved.

For trainees following the pre-August 2007 curriculum, the portfolio will include written documentation of all areas of work experience together with a collection of supporting evidence, following a standard format to demonstrate the competencies achieved. The portfolio will be presented at each RITA for scrutiny. Full guidance is available on the Faculty website.

Trainees following the post-August 2007 curriculum will use the E-portfolio to collect documentation, either from the start of their training or from the start of a new phase if they started using the paper portfolio. This record of evidence will be kept using the guidelines that are available on the Faculty website as part of the ARCP process

F2 Trainees

F2 trainees will have their progress reviewed after the first four months of their placement. A full assessment will be undertaken at 12 months.

Specialty Registrars in Dental Public Health

Dental trainees have a similar assessment process but will report to their dental Training Programme Director,

Educational supervisor and Dental ARCP.

Training Locations and Placements 

Rotations

Specialty Registrars are expected to gain experience in at least two different training locations, in addition to health protection experience, in order to be exposed to a wide range of organisational cultures and public health issues.

The training programme runs on a system of rotation zones, with each zone including three or four potential locations. Placement within rotational zones will be confirmed following the offer of a post. The zone offered is determined by:

  • the availability of slots
  • zone preferences indicated by StR’s
  • StR’s national recruitment ranking score.

The most highly ranked StR will have their zone preferences considered first against available slots. There can be no guarantee of training location or zone and applicants must be prepared to work in any one of the zones.

The current Rotation Zones are:

  • East Zone 
    • Gloucestershire County Council
    • Wiltshire County Council
    • Swindon Borough Council
    • Bath and North East Somerset Council
  • South Zone 
    • Cornwall Council
    • Plymouth Council
    • Devon County Council
    • Torbay Council
    • Somerset County Council
  • North Zone 
    • Gloucestershire County Council
    • South Gloucestershire County Council
    • Bristol City Council
    • North Somerset County Council
    • Somerset County Council
  •  Academic Institutions
    • University of Bristol
    • University of the West of England
    • Exeter University

All trainees are expected to remain in their agreed rotation zone. Exceptional circumstances to this will be considered on an individual basis.

Trainees usually remain in their initial training placement until completion of Phase 2 of their training.

Placements

Trainees are encouraged to undertake a variety of approved additional placements to enhance their experience or to pursue special interest options. This includes working at a regional level at some point during their training, most specialist placements would take place during phase 3.

Initially trainees should discuss possible placements with their educational supervisor to ensure its relevance to their training needs. A clear outline of the expected work programme and the way in which it will address the trainee’s training needs and enhance their experience should then be submitted to Training Programme Director for formal approval before commencing the attachment.

Options for general and special interest placements within the South West region include:

Academic Public Health

Placements are available in three public health academic training locations: the University of Bristol, the University of the West of England and the Peninsula Medical School.

Health Protection

Placement are available for all trainees and those wishing to specialise in Health Protection. StRs should discuss current opportunities with one of the PHE Specialty Tutors.

Public Health Information

For trainees wishing to achieve additional experience within public health information, placements may be available within the South West Public Health Observatory based in Bristol.

Regional working

Placements are available within the regional Department of Health, Health Education England and Public Health England.

Jersey

Placements will be available within the State of Jersey, Public Health Department and will provide an insight into an integrated approach to the development and delivery of public health programmes.

Health Services Public Health

Acute Trust placements are available at Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Other phase 3 opportunities include locations on the FPH national treasures list. StRs wishing to pursue this need to follow the application guidance available on the Faculty of Public Health web-site.

End of Placement Review

At the end of each placement, trainees are expected to complete a confidential end of placement questionnaire. The questionnaire is available on the training programme website www.swph-education.org.uk. Once completed, these should be returned to the Programme Office.

Review of Training Locations

The Faculty Adviser and/or the Training Programme Director will aim to informally visit each of the main training locations on an annual basis. When visiting training locations the Faculty Adviser or Training Programme Director takes account of issues arising from the annual trainee survey conducted by PMETB and the trainees’ end of placement questionnaires. Trainees are also encouraged to undertake audits of their training on a regular basis. Matters of great concern should not be held over to the annual visit.

Time Out Of Programme (OOP) 

There may be a variety of reasons why a Specialty Registrar may seek to take time out of the specialty training programme. There are four categories of out of programme time defined in the Gold Guide and all must be agreed by the Training Programme Director prior to seeking approval from the Postgraduate Dean. Applications should be made following the Severn Postgraduate Medical Education guidance and must be made at least six months in advance. Where time out of programme is requested to count towards CCT, Faculty of Public Health approval must also be sought. Therefore, early discussion of proposals must take place as early as possible.

Taking time out of programme for approved training (OOPT)

This allows a Specialty Registrar to gain experience which is not part of the specialty training programme and must be prospectively approved by the GMC and the FPH as training which will count towards CCT.

Taking time out of programme for research (OOPR)

To allow time to be taken to undertake a period research. This type of time out of programme may be counted towards CCT.

Taking time out of programme for experience (OOPE)

This allows a Specialty Registrar to gain experience which is not part of the specialty training programme which is not approved by the GMC or the FPH as training which will count towards CCT. However, it may allow a StR to pursue a special interest.

Taking time of programme for a career break (OOPC)

International Public Health

Trainees may seek overseas experience. However a minimum of 24 months out of the total required 48 months of CCT training must be completed within the UK. There is an upper limit of three years for any out-of-programme experience which does not count towards CCT requirements and it should also be noted that not all experience gained by trainees outside of their official training programme will count towards their CCT training. Thus trainees are advised to clarify the current position with the Faculty of Public Health guidance and the Training Programme Director regarding any proposed time out of the training programme.

Educational Roles and Expectations 

In line with FPH guidelines and the Gold Guide, an Educational Supervisor is appointed to each trainee with responsibility for planning, co-ordinating and supervising training. Each trainee must also have regular access to a named academic tutor. There may also be times when the educational supervisor co-ordinates the work of other designated project supervisors. 

Progression through training is assessed by ‘Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) panels’ who look to academic, educational and project supervisors to play distinct roles in assessing evidence and providing reports on a specialty registrar’s progress. In addition to the above, each training location has a Specialty Tutor who supports quality of training in each location. Zone Lead Supervisors represent one of the four geographical zones or the Health Protection regions. They support all supervisors within their zone and ensure quality training standards are met.

Educational Supervisors

The FPH definition: ‘A trainer who is appointed and appropriately trained to be responsible for the overall supervision, management and assessment of a specified registrar's educational progress during a training placement or series of placements. They are responsible for assessing and confirming acquisition of learning outcomes and competences’.

Key elements of the role are to be committed to actively providing high quality training and timely supervision, processing documentation for ARCPs in a timely manner and conducting appraisals for registrars.

Educational supervisors have a longitudinal overview of the training of each trainee appointed. They are responsible for supervising the service experience, for ensuring that adequate resources are available to the trainee for that purpose, and for monitoring the adequacy of the programme.

Educational supervisors are responsible for providing a structured report of evidence of progress in training prior to the annual review process (ARCP or RITA) via e-portfolio. This report will be read by the ARCP/RITA panel and must have been discussed with the StR.

Educational supervisors will:

  • Assess the learning needs of trainees attached to them on an individual basis and draw up a realistic and achievable learning plan with them.
  • Be readily accessible to the trainees for whom they have been appointed supervisor.
  • Use a written framework for training with regular review and constructive feedback. Be able and willing to identify and ensure delegation of appropriate tasks and responsibilities to the Trainee.
  • Ensure that all ARCP or RITA competences are met and signed off
  • Provide support for trainees taking the Part A examination and preparing for the OSPHE.
  • Facilitate learning opportunities not available locally to ensure exposure to the full range of required competencies.
  • Encourage, support and offer the trainee constructive feedback.

Frequency of meetings between educational supervisor and specialty registrar

Throughout their time on the programme StRs will require different levels of input from their educational supervisor. As a guide the FPH suggests progress should be reviewed initially weekly, (with a minimum of 1 hour protected time) in addition to frequent informal contact. During the StRs first 18 months on the training programme this could equate to one hour per week prior to the masters programme, during academic holidays and on their return to the training location following the end of the masters course. Contact after the initial 18 month period will be negotiated between the StR and supervisor according to StRs training needs and should be documented in the learning agreement. GMC guidance states that StRs must meet regularly at least every three months to discuss their progress, outstanding learning needs and how to meet them.

All educational supervisors must meet the following FPH criteria in order to be considered for the role:

  • be on the Specialist Register or the UKPHR of public health specialists or the dental equivalent
  • be a consultant or senior professional working in an area relevant to public health.
  • meet the requirements of the local deanery training programme and has attended the severn core competency modules.
  • keep up to date with the curriculum and assessment systems.
  • participate in FPH CPD or equivalent scheme.
  • have a commitment to delivering high quality training eg by undertaking a higher qualification in teaching or education for health professionals

Academic Supervisors

Each trainee has a nominated academic supervisor who is responsible for providing supervision, support and advice on an ongoing basis and for helping prepare trainees for their MFPH examinations (Part A and Part B).

Trainees will be allocated to an academic supervisor at one of the three academic centres in the region – University of Bristol, University of the West of England and the Peninsula Medical School. This allocation will be made before the trainee starts the programme and will take account of the trainee’s initial training location, past experience, career intentions and the current workload of all academic supervisors.

The main responsibility of academic supervisors is to ensure that trainees achieve competency in the academic disciplines that are central to providing evidence based public health and health commissioning.

Academic supervisors will:

  • Assess the learning needs of trainees attached to them on an individual basis and draw up a realistic and achievable learning plan with them.
  • Be readily accessible to the trainees for whom they have been appointed supervisor.
  • Use a written framework for training with regular review and constructive feedback. Be able and willing to identify and ensure delegation of appropriate tasks and responsibilities to the Trainee.
  • Ensure that all ARCP or RITA competences are met and signed off.
  • Provide support for trainees taking the Part A examination and preparing for the OSPHE.
  • Facilitate learning opportunities not available locally to ensure exposure to the full range of required competencies.
  • Encourage, support and offer the trainee constructive feedback.
  • Provide support with writing papers for peer review in journals or at conference presentations
  • Advise on training opportunities in academic public health
  • Provide specific supervision for trainees who become lecturers or academic trainees.

The academic and educational supervisors with the trainee will agree a programme for academic supervision during the formal academic training period. A copy will be sent to the Training Programme Director.

Academic supervisors are responsible for providing a structured report of evidence of progress in training prior to the annual review process (ARCP or RITA) via e-portfolio. This report will be read by the ARCP/RITA panel and must have been discussed with the StR.

Frequency of meetings between academic supervisor and specialty registrar

It is expected that every trainee meets with their academic supervisor on appointment and has a minimum of three face to face meetings with their academic supervisor each year, at least one of these should be a three-way face to face meeting with their educational supervisor and academic supervisor each year.  

Further guidance and a sample academic ARCP report is available in the following document; Academic Public Health training: Regional guidance for Academic and Educational supervisors and Public Health specialty registrars in the Severn Deanery.

Project Supervisors

Trainees may undertake a variety of work under a project supervisor other than their educational supervisor. This will be agreed in discussion with their educational supervisor as part of their work programme. Task contracts may be helpful in setting aims, objectives, scope and duration of pieces of work.

Project supervisors should:

  • have a broad understanding of public health, though not necessarily a public health qualification
  • understand the relevance of the project in meeting the trainee’s required learning outcomes
  • be committed to providing high quality training and be able to demonstrate it by attending Training the Trainer or other equivalent courses
  • be willing and able to set aside protected time for supervision with the trainee and educational supervisor as appropriate.

Training and selection of supervisors

Competent public health professionals do not automatically have the knowledge, skills and attitudes to train well. Supervisors require initial and continuing education to develop their training competence. Therefore, all new and existing supervisors must meet the seven core training requirements developed by the Severn Postgraduate Medical Education to ensure compliance with the General Medical Council (GMC) training requirements. It sill be a formal requirement to have met all seven competencies by 31st July 2012.

All educational and academic supervisors must have received training in the following core competencies:

  • Roles and Responsibilities of Educational Supervisors and an overview of the other key roles required in the training of doctors
  • Guidance on required trainee assessments
  • Appraisal processes and skills
  • Educational theory and practice
  • Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) processes
  • Equality and Diversity (certificated)
  • How to Support Trainees (previously Doctors in Difficulty)

Consultants wishing to become educational supervisors should review the FPH requirements and approach their line manager and the Training Programme Director in the first instance. Academics interested in becoming academic supervisors should approach the Specialty Tutor at their institution.

Following agreement of the role and time commitments the above training will need to be undertaken prior to a Specialty Registrar being allocated. It should be noted that StRs will be allocated according to training location and need so not all supervisors will have an StR at all times.

Specialty Tutors

Specialty tutors are a standard feature of all specialty training programmes in the Severn Deanery. Each training location will have a nominated specialty tutor who is identified as an enthusiast to support quality of training in each location to ensure the systematic implementation of the Severn Deanery Quality Framework.  Specialty tutors are educational or academic supervisors who have achieved all seven core competencies required to be an accredited Educational Supervisor by background. University leads provide the specialty tutor role at each of the three locations.

The role of specialty tutors is to help:

  • Maintain an environment within the departmental multi-professional team that supports training and delivers the curriculum and relevant assessments at Foundation, and Specialty levels
  • Support trainees and supervisors
  • Ensure systems are in place for induction, developing the quality of training, delivery of formal education and study leave management
  • Provide a short annual departmental report of training (Severn Deanery provides a template for this). This would include reviewing any quality indicators for the department, such as provided by General Medical Council (GMC) and Deanery Surveys
  • Act as point of contact for the Training Programme for promotion of training events and other communications where local support is particularly needed.

Specialty tutors support rather than line manage their supervisor colleagues. In some locations DsPH have adopted the specialty tutor role rather than delegating to an educational supervisor in their department.

 Method of appointment: nomination by Director of the training location e.g. DPH.

 Term of office: 3 years can be re-appointed for one term of office.

List of Specialty Tutors at December 2012

Zone Lead Supervisors

In the South West region there are six lead supervisors, (four covering each zone and two covering the HPA north and south regions). These roles do not normally feature in the structure of specialty training programmes, but are considered a helpful means of developing closer relationships between the Programme and training locations given the geography of the South West.

Their roles are:

  • To act as a point of contact for supervisors in their geographical area and provide support to colleagues as needed (e.g. mentoring new supervisors)
  • To organise local learning events and build on those offered by the training programme
  • To represent their area on the Training Committee, both to bring items to the committee and feedback outcomes from the committee to colleagues
  • To keep the Training Programme Director up to date of training issues within their area.

 Method of appointment: volunteer – vote if over subscribed; approved by TPD/Chair of RTC

 Term of office: 3 years can be re-appointed for one further term of office.

Induction Programme 

The regional induction programme welcomes all Specialty Registrars, including those from academic and dental disciplines, to the training programme, providing an overview of training in the South West and the local programme arrangements.

This is run through a series of regional induction days which cover the following topics:

  • The role of the Training Programme Office, the Faculty Adviser, the Deanery and the Training Programme Director
  • Understanding the curriculum
  • Assessment and the ARCP process
  • Building a work-based learning relationship that incorporates not only education and competency issues, but also takes into account the working and personal styles of the supervisor and trainee
  • The academic support available throughout the StR’s training
  • Practical advice about the Part A MFPH examination and an understanding of the Part B OSPHE
  • Health protection as part of public health training
  • An introduction to key organisations and their involvement in public health

At the beginning of their training, all trainees will have the option to be provided with a laptop computer. The laptop will remain the property of the Training Programme and should be returned at the end of the trainee’s training. Throughout its use, trainees must abide by information governance requirements of their training locations.

Phase One And Phase Two Of The Training Programme 

All trainees will start their training in August. Trainees undertaking an MSc or MPH will spend a couple of weeks at their first training location before commencing their academic course. Those trainees who have already completed their masters course will start their training at their first training location.

All trainees will have a local induction programme arranged for them by their supervisors to start at the time they take up appointment in their initial training location. Induction programmes should be tailored to the individual trainees, following a pre-appointment discussion of their training needs with their educational supervisor. However, core components of induction programmes will include:

  • Meeting key members of the public health department, host organisation and partner organisations
  • Attendance at regular public health and host organisation meetings
  • Introduction to NHS structures
  • Introduction to routine information sources
  • Shadowing key members of the public health team
  • Discussion of training needs, in particular any specific ‘know how’ learning needs in preparation for the Part A examination

Local induction should last no more than six to eight weeks.

During Phase 1 the trainee should meet with their educational supervisor at their initial training location for at least one hour per week.

Expectations of Specialty Registrars whilst attending the academic course

The priority during the academic year is to gain knowledge for the Part A MFPH. However, StRs should remain in contact with their training location whilst attending the academic course and, unless on annual or study leave agreed with their educational supervisor, should attend their training location during the term recesses. Where the StR is attending the academic course will determine whether contact in term time is in person or by e-mail / telephone. Whilst this contact with the training location will not count towards the 48 months required for CCT, it is an expectation of South West Public Health Training Programme. Maintaining contact will help observe and better understand the theory being taught on the academic course. Attendance at tutorials is encouraged as long as it does not interrupt the academic work.

It is expected that trainees return to their training location after completion of the taught element of their academic course. However, it is recognised that they will require protected time in order to write up and complete any written assignments and their dissertation in accordance with time requirement stipulated by their relevant academic institution. This ‘protected time’, must be agreed with their educational supervisor.

Annual leave during the academic year must be taken during the term recesses. All leave must be agreed with the educational supervisor.

Within the first three months of joining the Training Programme all trainees are required to enrol with the Faculty of Public Health. An enrolment form may be downloaded from the FPH website . Forms should be completed and sent with supporting documents to the FPH Education and Training Department.

During Phase 1, the Training Programme will include the following elements:

  • formal academic training for Part A MFPH
  • regional academic events
  • trainee tutorial programme
  • routine department or inter-departmental meetings
  • management training

During Phase 1, trainees are expected to:

  • establish and maintain contact with their academic supervisor
  • attend an appropriate course of academic study. These arrangements must be agreed by the Training Programme Director and educational supervisor
  • consult with their educational supervisor and academic supervisor over the choice of project for any MSc or MPH dissertation
  • pass Part A of the MFPH examination
  • identify and maximise opportunities to prepare for taking their OSPHE (Part B) MFPH
  • take their Part B MFPH approximately six months after passing their Part A MFPH
  • obtain MFPH
  • complete a training portfolio for formal review at their ARCP or RITA

Trainees will generally leave their first training location after completion of Phase 2 of their training – two to three years into their five year training.

Phase Three Of The Training Programme 

In Phase 3 of their training, the trainee will usually move to their second placement within the same rotation zone. This placement will last for approximately two years.

During this phase, trainees are expected to:

  • attend regional and departmental events
  • complete ARCP documentation and their training portfolio and attend for annual assessments as required
  • obtain varied service experience and consider undertaking specialist placements
  • undertake research and publish findings as appropriate
  • be awarded a CCT and be recommended to the GMC for inclusion on the Specialist Register or be recommended for registration with the UK Public Health Register for Public Health Specialists.

Completion of Training – CCT

The Training Programme recommends that all Specialty Registrars should complete their learning outcomes within six months of their CCT date so that they can spend the final six months of training obtaining experience in an acting up capacity and to focus on making themselves ready to apply for Consultant posts.

Completion of Specialty training in public health is complete when you have had your final ARCP and you have received an Outcome 6 stating that all of the criteria for a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) have been achieved.

Once an ARCP outcome 6 form has been completed the Completion of Training Form must be completed, this needs to be signed by the Training Programme Director and then sent to the Faculty of Public Health with the ARCP Outcome form.  This form can be downloaded from the Faculty website. 

Providing the above forms have been completed accurately then the Registrar will be admitted to Membership of the Faculty of Public Health.

On completion of training registrars from a medical background are recommended to the General Medical Council (GMC) for inclusion on the Specialist Register, while those from other disciplines are recommended for registration with the UK Public Health Register (UKPHR).

The Postgraduate Board has approved the introduction of a limit on timeframes within which a doctor is able to apply for a CCT/CP. The limit will be 12 months from the doctors expected end of training date.

It is important that Registrars process their CCT information to the Faculty as soon as possible after they have received their ARCP Outcome 6.  The above process can take a while to go through the Faculty and more importantly in the case of a medical Registrar it has to also be processed by the General Medical Council before an award of a CCT can be given and submission to the relevant register.

A Registrar is unable to commence a Consultant post unless a CCT has been awarded by the Faculty and/or GMC.  To be a Consultant a Registrars name must appear on the applicable register.

The CCT fee is payable to FPH before a recommendation to the regulator is made.  The fee for 2013 and 2014 has been set at £125.

Applying for Consultant posts

The Faculty of Public Health (FPH) advises that applicants who are Specialty Registrars in public health, but not yet on the GMC Specialist Register, must have fully passed the Part B MFPH examination in order to be eligible to be short-listed for a consultant grade post.

FPH also advises that suitable signed documentary evidence must be provided by such applicants to confirm that they are within six months (i.e. six months beforehand) of being included on the GMC Specialist Register at the date of interview. The documentary evidence should be:

  • either a RITA Form G/ARCP 6 (Final Record of Satisfactory Progress) or a letter from the Training Programme specifying the date for completion of training AND
  • a letter from FPH confirming that the applicant has fully passed the Part B MFPH examination.

Remaining in training post after CCT date.

The Orange Book, the Gold Guide and the local Postgraduate Dean are the sources of information about the constraints around remaining in a training post after the award of the CCT. 

This is at the discretion of the Training Programme, Registrars are requested to provide documentary evidence to the Head of School and TPD to confirm that the Registrar is continuing to make satisfactory progress towards agreed goals and to provide evidence of applications for Consultant posts.  The Head of School and TPD will need to be updated on a regular basis during the six months as to what progress is being made.

F2 Trainee Training 

F2 trainees will be based in those training locations considered suitable for initial placements for trainees. In practice, they will be based in departments of public health.

The F2 trainee’s training will have the following features:

  • Training will be co-ordinated by an educational supervisor within the public health department
  • The specific duties of each F2 trainee will be agreed with their educational supervisor at the start of the attachment to best meet the educational needs and objectives of the individual
  • F2 trainees will undertake service based projects during their attachment as well as contributing to the general work of the department in which they are working
  • The educational supervisor will arrange an induction programme for each F2 trainee, which should include health protection training, access to routine data sources and an overview of NHS structures
  • The F2 trainee should have protected time with their educational supervisor set aside each week
  • The F2 trainee should keep a portfolio of work they have completed or experience they have gained as evidence of achieving their objectives
  • The F2 trainee should be provided with a variety of exposures to public health practice, including gaining an understanding of health protection through an attachment to the local health protection unit
  • F2 trainees should attend regular meetings organised by the Foundation Year Programme for all F2 trainees and will be encouraged to participate in other local public health CPD programmes and training sessions

The South West Public Health Education And Training Committee 

The Public Health Education and Training Committee is responsible for overseeing the establishment, implementation and monitoring of a comprehensive high quality approach to multidisciplinary public health training and development in the South West. Specifically it is responsible for the running and oversight of a regional training programme for public health specialists.

Terms of Reference for the Public Health Education and Training Committee are shown in Appendix 2.

Membership of the committee includes:

  • Regional Director of Public Health
  • Faculty Adviser
  • Training Programme Director
  • Three or four nominated lead supervisors representing all areas of the region
  • One Health Protection Agency representative
  • One Strategic Health Authority representative
  • One academic supervisor representing all 3 public health academic locations
  • Two public health trainees nominated by the trainees’ committee
  • Regional CPD Co-ordinator
  • Regional Adviser in Dental Public Health
  • Nominee of the South West and Western branch of the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health Officers
  • Associate Postgraduate Dean with the regional lead for public health

The Director of Workforce and Finance of NHS South West or their nominee is also included as an ex-officio member of the committee.

Secretarial support for the committee is provided by the Training Programme Office, specifically the School Support Manager.

Training Programme Support 

Regional Faculty Adviser

The Faculty Adviser is a Member or Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health and is appointed by the Faculty Board. Under the directions of the Faculty Board, the Faculty Adviser shall:

  • promote training and continuing education in public health in the South West region
  • advise on arrangements for the appointment of consultants and on recruitment generally to the specialty of public health with a view to maintaining the highest possible standards of professional competence and practice of public health
  • liaise between the Faculty and its Education Committee on the one hand and the local membership and training organisations on the other
  • shall be available at all times to all trainees in post across the South West region.

Training Programme Director

The Training Programme Director is appointed by the Deanery to organise, develop and oversee the running of the public health training programme in the South West. They will work in close collaboration with the Public Health Education and Training Committee and will oversee the work programme of the Training Programme Office.

Training Programme Office

The Training Programme Office is based within Severn Postgraduate Medical Education. The office based team consists of a Programme Manager, School Support Mananger and Training Programme Co-ordinator.

The Training Programme School Support Manager provides the following support for the Training Programme:

  • Administrative support
  • First point of contact for trainees seeking advice
  • Maintenance of the database of trainees and their progress
  • Coordination of the regional tutorial programme
  • Organisation of ARCPs 

The Programme Manager is responsible for the provision of the Training Programme’s employment service and comprehensive human resources for all trainees, both medical and non medical. All queries regarding personnel issues including sick leave, holiday entitlement and flexible working should be directed to the Human Resources and Development Manager.

Tutorial Programme And Trainee Meetings 

A programme of tutorials is offered each academic term and consists of approximately four study days per term or 12 sessions per year. The content is developed by the trainees in consultation with the Training Programme Director and Training Programme Office. All trainees are expected to attend and participate in the tutorial programme.

At the end of each term the School Support Manager provides the Education and Training Committee with a summary report of the tutorial programme which includes attendance and an evaluation.

In addition, trainees may organise further meetings where they can share their work and experiences. The trainee members of the Education and Training Committee will prepare a brief report on each of these trainee meetings for the committee.

The trainees regularly audit the whole training programme and their results are received by the Education and Training Committee.

Regional Academic Events 

Regional academic events are held across the South West for those working in public health, including the trainees. Currently there are two key events each year:

  • A one day scientific conference held in the summer, at which all trainees are expected to submit abstracts of their work, at some point during their training. Abstracts are peer-reviewed before acceptance as presentations.
  • A two day public health residential school held in the autumn comprising interactive workshops and presentations.

Support For Part A And Part B Of The MFPH Examination 

Examiners

Examiners for Part A and Part B of the MFPH provide informal support and guidance for trainees undertaking the examinations. Specifically they will help with marking practice questions, commenting on Part B experience and giving practice oral examinations. Details of examiners within the South West are available on the Faculty of Public Health’s website.

Part A MFPH

Academic training for the Part A examination will normally involve studying for an MSc or MPH in Public Health. In addition, trainees are encouraged to arrange supplementary tutorials and attend regional revision programmes made available to trainees before taking the examination. They are also required to meet regularly with their academic supervisor whilst studying for their MSc or MPH - at least once before the first term and then during each term or in the following vacation - to review progress towards Part A MFPH and to discuss their dissertation.

Part B MFPH (OSPHE)

Specific training events in relation to the Part B examination are provided for both trainees and supervisors on an ad hoc basis. Additionally trainees and supervisors are encouraged to utilise the day-to-day working experience to allow as many varied and useful experiences for the trainee. Opportunities to be involved in putting public health skills into practice should be proactively sought by the trainee.

Regular mock OSPHE examinations are held within the region for all trainees after completion of their Part A examination. Mock examinations will consist of a series of scenarios to enable practice role-play experience for the trainees.

Buddying Scheme 

A buddying scheme aims to provide each public health trainee with a more experienced ‘buddy’ who can offer support and advice. The scheme does not replace the relationship a trainee has with their supervisor, but is a complementary, less formal system of support.

Buddies will be offered to all new entrants to the programme by the Chair of the Trainees’ Committee.

Existing trainees acting as buddies will usually be post Part A and normally be based in a different training location although will not be at the opposite end of the region. Participation in the scheme is voluntary but trainees need to commit the necessary time to the task.

New trainees will make contact with their buddy following appointment but before taking up their post. They will arrange to make contact on a regular basis depending on the new trainee’s needs.

All discussions are treated in confidence and not disclosed to anyone else without consent. However it should be clear that if serious issues relating to training arise, these are to be referred to the Training Programme Director.

Membership of the Faculty of Public Health and Professional Registration 

After appointment to the Training Programme trainees will be required to enrol with the Faculty of Public Health. An enrolment form may be downloaded from the FPH website. Forms should be completed and sent with supporting documents to the FPH Education and Training Department.

Subsequently trainees will be sent their Training Record Book and a letter detailing their expected CCT date.

Diplomat membership will then be made open to all trainees once they have passed the Part A MFPH examination.

Full membership of the Faculty is then awarded to those who pass both Parts A and B MFPH. It may also be made available to individuals through election or by exemption.

On completion of their training, the following recommendations will be made:

  • medical doctors will be recommended to the GMC for inclusion on the Specialist Register;
  • dental public health trainees will be recommended for registration with the GDC’s Specialist Register;
  • those from other disciplines will be recommended for specialist registration with the UK Public Health Register.

 

Section C Human Resources 

Recruitment 

Overview

Recruitment takes place early each year for posts commencing in August. This is part of a national process which includes:

  • application through a web-based portal
  • an assessment centre to test for numerical and verbal reasoning
  • a selection centre to demonstrate essential criteria.

The training programme runs on a system of rotation zones, with each zone including three or four potential locations. Placement within rotational zones will be confirmed following the offer of a post. The zone offered is determined by:

  • the availability of slots
  • zone preferences indicated by StR’s
  • StR’s national recruitment ranking score

The most highly ranked StR will have their zone preferences considered first against available slots. There can be no guarantee of training location or zone and applicants must be prepared to work in any one of the zones.

Specialty Registrars in Public Health

A national person specification and selection criteria are available each year through the Faculty of Public Health website.

F2 Trainees

The programme is able to offer a limited number of F2 trainee attachments of twelve months’ duration. The attachment in public health is part of the Modernising Medical Careers two-year Foundation Programme of postgraduate medical training. The purpose of the attachment is to give Year 2 trainees an insight into the practice of public health, an understanding of the work of a Primary Care Trust and practical experience in a number of public health competencies.

Walport Lecturer and Academic Clinical Fellowship Posts

Trainee positions for Walport lecturers and Academic Clinical Fellows in public health are available on an ad hoc basis and will be advertised through the Severn Deanery website as available.

Specialty Registrars in Dental Public Health

Trainee positions for StRs in Dental Public Health are available on an ad hoc basis and will be advertised through the Severn Deanery website.

Inter-Deanery Transfers

Applicants who have completed part of their public health training in other regions and have well-founded reasons for transferring to the South West region will be considered for the regional Public Health Specialty Training Programme. Applications should be made through the Severn Deanery website:

Contracts 

All contracts for public health trainees are held by Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust for the Training Programme. There is dedicated personnel support to administer the contracts from the Human Resources and Development Manager within the Training Programme Office.

Any changes to terms and conditions, i.e. changes in hours, starting the on-call rota etc must be discussed with the Human Resources and Development Manager well in advance of any change and no later than a month before the planned change to allow the payroll record to be amended.

Insurance and Professional Indemnity Cover 

The main principle of NHS indemnity is that NHS bodies are vicariously liable for the negligent acts and omissions of their employees and that NHS bodies should have arrangements for meeting this liability. All employers are vicariously liable for the negligent acts of their employees, provided that the employee was acting in the course of their employment. As a result, personal cover, from a defence organisation, trade union or other body, is not required in relation to practice as an employee. Personal cover would only be required in relation to self-employed practice.

This statement does not preclude individual employees from taking out insurance or professional indemnity cover if they wish from a defence organisation, trade union or other body of their choosing. Specialty Registrars registered with the GMC should follow the relevant guidance as per the Good Medical Guide.

Annual Leave 

Annual leave entitlements will be in line either with Agenda for Change or Medical and Dental terms and conditions. For all Specialty Registrars, who commenced the training programme from 1st January 2010 onwards, the leave year runs from their commencement date.

Non medical Specialty Registrars will receive the entitlement to annual leave and general public holidays in line with NHS Agenda for Change terms and conditions of service as follows:

Length of Service Annual

Leave and public holidays

On appointment

27 days + 8 days

On appointment

29 days + 8 days

After 10 years service

33 days + 8 days

Medical Specialty Registrars will receive the entitlement to annual leave and general public holidays in line with NHS hospital medical and dental staff, doctors and dentists in public health and the community health services terms and conditions of service. In addition to their annual leave entitlement they will receive a further two statutory days per year as shown:

 

Pay scale incremental points

Annual Leave, statutory days and public holidays

1st or 2nd point

25 days + 2 days + 8 days

3rd or higher point

30 days + 2 days + 8 days

For part-time workers, annual leave should be calculated on a pro-rata basis and be taken in hours with an allocation for a pro-rata amount of bank holidays.

Annual leave forms can be found on the SWPHT web-site. All annual leave should be agreed with educational supervisors in advance. Authorised forms should be returned to the Training Programme Office to be kept in the trainees’ personal files.

Other than under exceptional circumstances, any outstanding annual leave cannot be carried over into the next year. A maximum of a week can be authorised and carried over but this should be agreed with the Educational Supervisor and the Programme Team informed.

Whilst StRs are attending their academic course at the beginning of their training, annual leave must be taken during the term recesses. All leave must be agreed with the educational supervisor.

Sickness Leave 

All incidents of sickness should be reported to the trainee’s educational supervisor immediately. Details of sickness leave and sickness certificates should then be forwarded to the Training Programme Office within the month that the sickness occurred.  The full policy can be found on the Employment page of the School of Public Health website.   Absence from training, other than for study or annual leave, may have an impact on the trainee's ability to demonstrate competence and the satisfactory completion of the curriculum.  Where a trainee has been absent for a total of 14 days or more in a 12 month period, this will trigger a review of whether the trainee needs to have their CCT date extended.  The following link is to the GMC policy statement relating to this GMC Positional statement

Study Leave 

Study leave aims to:

  • Enhance clinical education, training and learning.
  • Be incorporated as an integral part of the education and training process.
  • Provide education and training not easily acquired in the clinical setting e.g. the acquisition of a theoretical knowledge base.
  • Support the delivery of curriculum targets.
  • Be considered as part of the appraisal process between the trainee and their Educational Supervisor.

Policy

The Public Health Training Programme will adhere to the Severn Deanery policy. This policy provides further information on study leave and outlines points to consider when applying for study leave. In brief, Specialty Registrars are entitled to a maximum of 30 days study leave per year. It is expected that half (15 days) of this allowance is used for Regional Public Health Events for which a study leave application is not required. The other 15 days is for external use. The year’s allocation is calculated from the date of commencement onto the programme. Trainees who are less than full-time will be allocated study leave days on a pro-rata basis.

The study leave allowance is £563 per trainee per year. If you are undertaking a masters course, (or equivalent short-courses) during your first year on the programme, the study leave allowance will be used towards the cost of the masters course. Only external study leave expenses will be deducted from the £563 allowance.

Applying for Study Leave

Time off for study leave should be requested using the online Intrepid system. You should also include anticipated costs on your application. Study leave applications should be made at least 2 weeks prior to the date the leave is scheduled to take place. Applications made after the deadline may not be authorised.

Study leave applications are not required for the following Regional Public Health Events and related expenses will not be deducted from the study leave allowance;

  • Tutorials
  • Development School (Dartington)
  • Annual Training Conference
  • Scientific Conference

If you wish to attend any Locally run courses such as those below, a study leave application is required and attendance will be deducted from your 15 days external allocation but any related expenses will not be deducted from your £563 study leave allowance.

  • Short courses run by the Universities (Bristol, Exeter, UWE)
  • Part A Revision Courses
  • Professional and Generic Skills training
  • Other courses ran locally by institutions linked to the training programme ie.PHE/Severn PGME

For all external courses and conferences, study leave applications are required. External courses are defined as being courses that are not within region ie. FPH conference. External leave also includes exams and private study. Such events will be deducted from the 15 days external study leave Registrars are entitled to and expenses including course/conference fees, travel, accommodation and subsistence will be deducted from the £563 study leave allowance.

Registrars can access their leave and allowance entitlements and remaining balances when logging into the Intrepid system. If you experience any difficulties accessing the system please contact Gemma Cooke, School Support Manager.

Once you have submitted your application, you will receive an email notification once leave is approved.

If you need to claim study leave expenses this needs to be done using the E-travel system. Study leave expenses will only be authorised if an application has been made for the leave beforehand and anticipated costs were inputted. The deadline for submitted claims is the 5th of each month.

Please contact the Training Programme team should the course provider require a Purchase Order.

  • We cannot pay study leave to trainees whilst they are Out of Programme.
  • We cannot reimburse international flights.
  • We cannot reimburse exam fees.
  • We cannot pay for any claims without proof of payment and and a feedback form.
  • We can only pay up to £55 per night accommodation unless it is in London.

Study Leave Feedback Forms

In line with the Severn Deanery Study Leave policy, completion and submission of a Study Leave Feedback form is required following attendance of any external study leave you wish to claim expenses for, this is a quality control measure. Feedback forms should be submitted with or before a claim for expenses is received by the programme team. Feedback forms can be emailed electronically to Gemma Cooke or uploaded onto a registrar's ePortfolio, although a registrar must inform Gemma which way they intend to send the form.

Failure to submit feedback may result in expenses not being authorised.

Expectations whilst attending the academic course

The priority during the academic year is to gain knowledge for the Part A MFPH. However, StRs should remain in contact with their training location whilst attending the academic course and, unless on annual or study leave agreed with their educational supervisor, should attend their training location during the term recesses. Where the StR is attending the academic course will determine whether contact in term time is in person or by e-mail / telephone. Whilst this contact with the training location will not count towards the 48 months required for CCT, it is an expectation of South West Public Health Training Programme. Maintaining contact will help observe and better understand the theory being taught on the academic course. Attendance at tutorials is encouraged as long as it does not interrupt the academic work.

It is expected that trainees return to their training location after completion of the taught element of their academic course. However, it is recognised that they will require protected time in order to write up and complete any written assignments and their dissertation in accordance with time requirement stipulated by their relevant academic institution. This ‘protected time’, must be agreed with their educational supervisor.

Annual leave during the academic year must be taken during the term recesses. All leave must be agreed with the educational supervisor.

Maternity Leave 

Maternity leave of absence is available up to 52 weeks. However the pay received will be dependent on length of service with the NHS and the intention to return to work.

Occupational Maternity Pay (8 weeks’ full pay, 18 weeks’ half pay) is available for women with at least one year’s continuous service within the NHS at the beginning of the 11th week before the expected week of childbirth.

Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) rates are set by the Government and are payable for a maximum of 39 weeks from the start of maternity leave. It is set at two rates: 6 weeks at 90% of earnings and 33 weeks at a fixed standard weekly rate.

The full maternity leave policy can be found on School of Public Health website. This policy also provides details on adoption and paternity leave.

Absence from training, other than for study or annual leave, may have an impact on the trainee's ability to demonstrate competence and the satisfactory completion of the curriculum.  Where a trainee has been absent for a total of 14 days or more in a 12 month period, this will trigger a review of whether the trainee needs to have their CCT date extended.  The following link is to the GMC policy statement relating to this  GMC Positional statement

Less Than Full Time Training 

Trainees who have well-founded reasons for doing so may train flexibly. Reasons for working part-time should be discussed with their educational supervisor and the Training Programme Director prior to an application being made to the Severn Deanery. If an application is successful, their training duration will be lengthened pro rata to take account of their flexible working.

Homeworking

It is expected that Specialty Registrars in Public Health should use the homeworking policy within their training locations and any homeworking agreements should be discussed with supervisors.  In this instance we will not use the Homeworking policy used by Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. 

Feedback On The Training Programme 

To enable an effective evaluation and improvement of the quality of the training programme, Specialty Registrars who have completed the programme will be required to complete a questionnaire.

For individual trainees who choose to leave the programme early, a exit interview will be undertaken with the Human Resources and Development Manager and the Training Programme Director.

Key Contacts 

A list of key contacts for trainees whilst on the Training Programme is available School of Public Health.

Where a trainee is unsure of who to contact with any enquiry, they should liaise with the Training Programme Office for advice in the first instance.

 

Appendix one 

South West Public Health Speciality Training Programme

Deciding length of registrar contracts 

The FPH curriculum (2010) states that entrants with medical or other degrees:

  • with Part A MFPH will lead to a reduction in training time.
  • having completed an appropriate postgraduate degree in Public Health will lead to a reduction in training time provided the appropriate competencies in Phase 1 can be evidenced .

For the SW Programme:

  • Registrars joining the Programme with part A MFPH will be offered 4 year contracts
  • Registrars who have completed a relevant postgraduate degree prior to joining the programme will be further assessed by their academic and educational supervisors. The outcome of the assessment will inform the Head of School/Training Programme Director’s decision on the length of contract.

The assessment will address the following questions:

  • Taking account of the timing and quality of the postgraduate education received prior to joining the Programme, is it appropriate to expect this registrar to pass part A MFPH:
    • within 6 months of joining the programme
      or
    • within 6 - 12 months of joining the programme?
  • Based on evidence of learning outcomes already achieved, is it likely that this registrar will complete all phase learning 1 outcomes earlier than 12 months from starting the programme?

The assessment should also generate recommendations about any further academic support needed to achieve part A MFPH.

Options for reduced contract length. 

Contracts may be reduced by up to 12 months. The following examples are provided for illustration: all decisions will be based on individual circumstances.

One year reduction:

The registrar is assessed as follows:

  • has completed a postgraduate course that provides good support for part A preparation
  • the course was completed no more than 12 months prior to joining the Programme
  • evidence can be provided (through having attended the course or other experience) that progress has already been made towards achieving phase 1 learning outcomes.

Six months reduction:

The registrar is assessed as

  • having had some preparation for part A, but this is not sufficient to expect them to sit part A within 6 months of joining the Programme. This may be because the course offered relatively little part A support and/or it was more than 12 months before joining the Programme.
  • evidence can be provided (through having attended the course or other experience) that progress has already been made towards achieving phase 1 learning outcomes.

No reduction:

  • Attendance at the postgraduate course has provided insufficient preparation for part A, such that substantial ‘top up’ support will be needed eg attending other MPH modules, or attendance at another MPH. The candidate will not be ready to sit part A within 6 months of joining the Programme.
  • Evidence of prior achievement of learning outcomes is lacking.

 

Appendix two 

South West Public Health Speciality Training Programme Terms of Reference

Purpose

To oversee the establishment, implementation and monitoring of a comprehensive high quality approach to multidisciplinary public health training and development in the South West region, including specifically the running and oversight of the regional training programme for public health specialists.

Remit

Multi-disciplinary Public Health Training and Workforce Development 

To oversee the establishment, implementation and monitoring of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to public health training and development in the South West. This will include the following:

  • Provision of strategic leadership and direction for the future development of the public health workforce.
  • To ensure specialist public health training continues to develop
  • To approve and recommend a proposed budget to the SHA to support the regional programme.

Specialist Regional Training Programme

  • To oversee the regional training scheme for Specialists in Public Health:
  • Supporting local selection for training positions
  • Leading and supporting the training curriculum including assessment methodologies
  • Developing and managing standardised quality management systems on which quality assurance programmes depend, and which integrate with the Deanery quality assurance programme, including annual review of all trainees
  • Collecting, collating and providing evidence that the PMETB standards of training and education are met by the service providers
  • Facilitating the development of innovative training programmes for both specialty and generic skills
  • Developing policies for study leave and where appropriate co-ordinating the provision of common learning opportunities such as Regional training days, local training days, rotation placements, locally delivered courses
  • Encouraging participation in training and ensuring educational supervisors are appropriately trained
  • Ensuring that evidence is available that the national standards of training continue to be met when training takes place outside of the normal placements (OOPE) including training abroad
  • Promoting a multidisciplinary approach to learning and development
  • Disseminating quality assurance reports eg from PMETB survey
  • Advising on the recognition of new posts
  • Working closely with senior NHS and Local Authority/GOSW management so as to achieve effective joint management of education and service priorities
  • Sharing ideas, developments and good practice with other Postgraduate Schools across Deaneries, Colleges and other stakeholders
  • Ensuring that the business of the committee complies fully with Deanery/SHA governance arrangements
  • Producing an annual report on public health training and development in the South West
  • Entrusting committee members who represent nominated groups, to cascade committee decisions and information.

Continuing Professional Development 

To oversee the establishment, development and monitoring of a regional programme to support the development of CPD for public health specialists and practitioners across the region.

Method of Working

  • Members of the training committee will be eligible to serve a 3-year term, which may be extended by one further term of office.
  • Members representing training locations are permitted to send a deputy if they are unable to attend.
  • The Chair will be the Regional Director of Public Health who will report on the actions of the committee to the Chief Executive of the SHA and the Deanery where required to allow the Deanery to discharge their responsibilities for QA.
  • The Committee will normally meet three times a year.
  • The Committee may establish sub-committees on a permanent or ad hoc basis to look at specific issues as required e.g. CPD, workforce planning.
  • All members will have the right to put items on the agenda.
  • The Secretariat will be provided by the Public Health Training Programme Team.

South West Public Health Speciality Training Programme Committee 

Membership 

  • Regional Director of Public Health
  • Faculty Adviser
  • Training Programme Director
  • Three or Four nominated lead supervisors to represent all areas of the region
  • One Health Protection Agency representative
  • One Strategic Health Authority representative
  • One academic supervisor to represent Dept Social Medicine, Peninsula Medical School and University of West of England
  • Two Public Health trainees to be nominated by the trainees’ committee
  • Regional CPD Co-ordinator (if not included in the membership resulting from the above)
  • Regional Adviser in Dental Public Health
  • Nominee of the SW and Western branch of the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health Officers
  • Associate Postgraduate Dean with lead for Public Health in Deanery

 

Ex officio members:

Director of Workforce & Finance of Health Education South West or nominee

Secretariat provided by

Programme Manager

School Support Manager

Training Programme Co-ordinator