PHE South West Centre Health Protection Training Policy for

Specialty Registrars in Public Health

 

(and Arrangements for Participating in a Supervised On-Call PHE Health Protection Rota)

 

 Table of contents

PART 1– PHE South West Centre Health Protection Training – General Information

 

Introduction

Scope of Policy

Placement locations

Arranging phase 1 mandatory health protection placements

Arranging extended health protection training placements

Outline of responsibilities and expectations

Part 2 – Phase 1 Health Protection Placement – Detailed Outline

Aims and objectives of placement

Meeting learning outcomes

Working in the Acute Response Centre (ARC)

Partnership and proactive health protection work

Project work

Documenting learning experiences

Assessment of competence to participate in the PHE South West Centre out of hours on call rota

Continued development of health protection competence post-placement

Arrangements for registrars undertaking supervised on call (with effect from 1st September 2016)

Placement evaluation and quality assurance

 

List of Figures

Figure 1           Public Health Training Pathway Outlining Health Protection Training Opportunities

 

List of appendices               

APPENDIX 1        Guidance for methods of assessment for core health protection competences

APPENDIX 2        Summative assessment pro-forma for supervised on call

APPENDIX 3        Examples of summative assessment scenarios

APPENDIX 4        Supervision pro-forma for Specialty Registrars on placement

APPENDIX 5        ‘Knows-how’ and ‘shows-how’ checklist to support Specialty Registrars in Public Health to develop a wider knowledge of the system of health protection

APPENDIX 6        Guide for PHE staff and registrars carrying out health protection duties out of hours: Storing and transporting PII and confidential information off site

 

PART 1

 

PHE South West Centre Health Protection Training – General Information

 

Introduction

1.1    PHE has a strong commitment to training and will make every effort to ensure that public health specialty registrars have the widest opportunities to make the most of their placement, feel part of the team and gain good quality health protection training overseen by the Deputy Director of Health Protection.

1.2    This policy document is in two parts. Part 1 outlines general information regarding health protection training offered to Specialty Registrars in Public Health attached to PHE South West Centre. Part 2 outlines in further detail the phase 1 health protection placement delivered by PHE South West centre.

1.3    The policy is based on the Faculty of Public Health Specialty Training Curriculum (2015). For those following the 2010 curriculum, placement expectations and assessment processes are the same but differences in competences are acknowledged.

1.4    Health protection is a fundamental tenet of public health delivery at local, national and international levels. Therefore every educational /project supervisor has a role to play in supporting registrars to understand and improve their knowledge of the health protection system and relevant opportunities for them to show this understanding throughout their training. Therefore, health protection training should start at the beginning of training at induction into the programme, through induction to Local Authority placements, formal teaching through the MPH/MSc as well as Part A preparation.

Scope of policy 

2.1    This policy applies to: 

2.1.1 Registrars at the beginning of their training who will be introduced to the wider system of health protection including the roles and responsibilities of their host organisation. The checklist in APPENDIX 5 outlines additional ‘knows how’ and ‘shows how’ areas for the StR to work through from the beginning of their training and should be completed by the end of Phase 2. Completion of the checklist will inform sign-off of health protection competency 6.9 at the end of Phase 2.

2.1.2 The phase 1 health protection training rotation for all registrars who must spend a minimum of three months whole time equivalent training after taking the Part A exam (Figure 1). This includes ongoing support and supervision following their placement in order to achieve all health protection competences including participation in the health protection out of hours on call rota;

2.1.3 Health protection placements following completion of phase 1 and 2 competences. Registrars in their final year of training who wish to develop further skills and knowledge in health protection can opt for an extended health protection pathway with PHE (Figure 1). Based on learning needs, placements will be developed in partnership with a number of agencies which may include PHE South West Centre Health Protection Team, the Field Epidemiology Service based in Bristol, Local Authority Public Health Teams and specialist centres including the Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control (CIDSC) at Colindale, Centre for Radiation, Chemicals and Environmental Hazards (CRCE) at Chilton or Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response (EPRR) at Porton Down. These placements will be planned closely with the South West Public Health Training Programme Team in order to meet the training needs of the registrar.

2.2    This policy does not apply to placements outside of health protection provided by the PHE South West Centre or Field Epidemiology Services during Phases 1 and 2 of training.

 

Phase 1

Phase 2

ST 1

ST 2

ST 3

ST 4

ST 5

Knows

Knows how / shows

Shows how / does

Does

 Developing knowledge of wider system of health protection through all phase 1 placements. (see Appendix 5)

3 month health protection placement and on call assessment#

 Developing applying knowledge of wider system of health protection through all phase 2 placements. (see Appendix 5)

Extended health protection placement available following completion of phase 1 and 2 competences.

 

ARCP

ARCP

ARCP

ARCP

 

Part A

Part B

 

 

             

#mandatory for all registrars

 

Placement locations in the South West 

3.1    For their phase one 3 month rotation, registrars will be placed at Centre offices in either Bristol or Totnes). Registrars will be placed geographically according to their current training rotation as agreed with the South West Public Health Training Program Team. Registrars training in Devon, Cornwall and Somerset will be based at Totnes. Registrars training in Avon, Gloucestershire Wiltshire and Swindon will be based at Bristol. 

3.2    For registrars undertaking an extended health protection placement on completion of phase 1 and 2 competences, placement will be determined on the basis of identified training need but the substantive base will normally be one of the PHE South West Centre bases (Totnes or Bristol).

 

Arranging phase 1 mandatory health protection placements

4.1    Registrars should start their health protection placement after successfully completing the Part A exam. If exam preparation, training courses, leave of absence or other work interferes with the placement an extension of the placement may be recommended. Generally, it is not recommended that registrars sit exams during this placement.  

4.2    Registrars are responsible for liaising with the Training Programme Team to agree the timing of the health protection placement. The registrar should then contact the health protection PHE South West Centre Specialty Tutor (Mike Wade), at least 8 weeks in advance to agree the timing of the placement and to arrange a pre-placement meeting (no later than 4 weeks before the provisional commencement date).  The registrar will be assigned a PHE placement supervisor (accredited to train through the Training Programme Team) who will be responsible for the duration of the placement working alongside the registrar and their Educational Supervisor.

4.3    A pre-placement meeting will be convened to discuss previous health protection experience, identify learning needs and agree a provisional learning contract. As well as a brief introduction to work undertaken in the Acute Response Centre, the meeting will provide an opportunity to discuss a health protection project to be completed whilst on placement.  Ideally this will be a three-way meeting between the registrar, the placement supervisor and the educational supervisor.

4.4    At the pre-placement meeting the registrar should make their health protection placement supervisor aware of any special needs, e.g. disabilities, part-time work, or any annual leave or study leave they need to take during the placement.  The duration of the placement may need to be extended to take account of this.

4.5    At the pre-placement meeting registrars will be provided with an induction pack and agree with their project/educational supervisor the relevant visits and key individuals they should meet during their placement.  Registrars should start to make arrangements for these visits prior to starting their placement. 

4.6    Specialty Registrars in Public Health will have an honorary contract with PHE for the duration of their training. This is coordinated by sarah.jones@phe.gov.uk.  This will be discussed at the pre-placement meeting and the process started as it can take some time to complete. Specialty Registrars in Public Health are CRB checked at the start of their training and records are held by the training programme.

4.7    Although the placement supervisor has a key role, registrars will also have access to others who can provide support, training and advice, particularly with reference to specific areas of expertise.  This includes other consultants in health protection, consultant epidemiologists, health protection nurses/practitioners (HPN/Ps), epidemiology scientists and information staff.

 

Arranging extended health protection training placements 

5.1    On completion of all phase 1 and phase 2 competences, registrars may consider, with the Training Programme Team, an extended placement in health protection.

5.2    The placements will only be agreed for a minimum period of 6 months. Following discussions with Training Programme Team, the registrar should arrange a meeting with the PHE Specialty Tutors for Health Protection and Field Epidemiology Services at least 8 weeks prior to an anticipated placement start date. At this pre-placement meeting, a bespoke training programme and learning agreement will be developed in order to address additional learning needs identified by the registrar. 

5.3    Where the registrar wants to develop additional expertise in areas of Field Epidemiology, an Educational Supervisor will be identified in this service to oversee the placement. Where the registrar intends to develop their generic health protection knowledge/skill, an Educational Supervisor will be identified within the Health Protection Team. Project supervisors may also be appointed to support the placement from other specialist teams within PHE that support health protection delivery (e.g. Centre for Radiation, Chemicals and Environmental Hazards) and the Local Authority Public Health Teams.

5.4    Where there is a vacancy and in accordance with the South West Public Health Training Programme Team, registrars on an extended training placement may apply for an ‘Acting-Up’ post. Such posts will be discussed with the registrar during their placement.

 

Induction 

6.1    The aim of induction is to enable registrars to become acquainted with the training location, PHE organisational structures including the South West Centre, roles of team members and roles and responsibilities of external partners. 

6.2    Registrars will have a structured induction overseen by their health protection placement supervisor at the beginning of their placement using a PHE induction pack provided to them. Registrars should also familiarise themselves with local reference materials, resources and local tutorials they can access during this time.    

 

Outline of responsibilities and expectations

7.1    PHE expect the following from registrars during all health protection placements: 

7.1.1  to inform their health protection placement supervisor of any special requirements, ideally at the pre-placement meeting;

7.1.2  to agree a learning contract with their health protection placement supervisor;

7.1.3  to attend the work place as required and on time;

7.1.4  to share their outlook/work diaries with PHE staff;

7.1.5  to notify their health protection placement supervisor (or unit administrator if not available) when ill and unable to work;

7.1.6  to act in accordance with the PHE policies and procedures, including health and safety;

7.1.7  to agree tasks and projects with their health protection placement supervisor;

7.1.8  to participate in one-to-one supervision sessions with their health protection placement supervisor;

7.1.9  to attend weekly clinical meetings and other meetings to maximise learning as advised by the health protection placement supervisor;

7.1.10 to work closely and collaboratively with all members of the PHE team;

7.1.11 to inform their health protection placement supervisor of non-health protection pieces of work that have to be completed during the placement;

7.1.12 to alert their health protection placement supervisor if deadlines on health protection work will not be met;

7.1.13 to hand-over of cases and significant events at work in a timely manner;

7.1.14 to maintain high quality records in accordance with PHE policies (please refer to APPENDIX 6 for supplementary information);

7.1.15 to Inform the health protection placement supervisor of any difficulties straight away, including concerns about lack of opportunities to gain experience;

7.1.16 to participate in local on-call training days and health protection training events;

7.1.17 to reflect on learning experiences and document these in a log book;

7.1.18 to provide mutual support to other registrars attached to the team;

7.1.19 to recognise the pressures on other members of the team.

 

7.2   Registrars should expect the following from PHE during their health protection placements:

7.2.1 to be supervised by an approved health protection placement supervisor;

7.2.2 to support the registrar to identify learning needs;

7.2.3 to provide learning opportunities which contribute to meeting competencies;

7.2.4 to offer regular one-to-one training/support sessions (an average of one hour per week);

7.2.5 to establish the training programme / learning agreement  with the registrar;

7.2.6 to regularly monitor the registrar’s performance taking into account feedback from other members of the team and relevant partners. This must include formal recorded supervision sessions between the health protection educational / project supervisor (Appendix 5);

7.2.7 to formatively assess  the individual’s competence in health protection;

7.2.8 to summatively assess the individual’s competence to commence supervised on call (see 14.4 and Appendix 3);

7.2.9 to sign and return Activity Summary Sheets, Learning Outcomes Summary of Assessment Sheet and Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) forms as required and in a timely manner;

7.2.10 to liaise with the registrar’s educational supervisor as and when required.

 

7.3    PHE will provide the following resources for registrars on health protection placements: 

7.3.1 access to desk-space, a computer, telephone, the internet, email and IT support;

7.3.2 access to the PHE library resources and signposting to other key national and regional resources;

7.3.3 all relevant information to support daily work;

7.3.4 resources required for out of hours work.

7.3.5 administrative support may be available by negotiation for specific activities.

 

7.4  With regards to leave of absence:

7.4.1 annual leave, study leave and other planned leave should be negotiated with the health protection placement supervisor; 

7.4.2 registrars will be expected to report sickness absence to their health protection placement supervisor during their health protection placement, or when on call, which should subsequently be reported to the Training Programme Team by the supervisor.

 

PART 2

Phase 1 Health Protection Placement – Detailed Outline 

Aims and objectives of mandatory phase 1 placement

8.1   The placement is designed to ensure that registrars meet core health protection competencies taking into account their background and existing knowledge and skills, with the aim of ensuring that they become familiar with the scope and practice of health protection. 

 

8.2   The main aims are to:

8.2.1  ensure registrars successfully meet section 6 competences outlined in the 2015 Faculty of Public Health training curriculum;

8.2.2  provide registrars with an understanding of health protection practice and the system of health protection from within which the PHE health protection team operates;

8.2.3  prepare registrars to take part in the PHE South West Centre health protection on-call rota;

8.2.4  enable registrars to further develop health protection skills following the placement through structured support and supervision. 

 

8.3    The placement has the following objectives. At the end of the placement, registrars should have a general understanding of:

8.3.1  surveillance of communicable disease and environmental hazards;

8.3.2  roles of various agencies in diagnosis, prevention and control of communicable diseases and environmental hazards;

8.3.3  the legal basis of communicable disease control;

8.3.4  delivery of infection control in the community;

8.3.5  the role of immunisation including systems for monitoring vaccine uptake and adverse events and approaches to running immunisation programmes;

8.3.6  the role of public health in emergency planning;

8.3.7  environmental epidemiology and health risk assessment.

 

8.4     At the end of the placement, registrars should have developed skills in:

8.4.1  investigation and follow up of single cases of common communicable diseases;

8.4.2  using HPZone (case and incident management system) for day to day  health protection work;

8.4.3  investigation of outbreaks/incidents including the application of appropriate epidemiological methods and production of written reports;

8.4.4  advising professionals and the public on communicable diseases and potential health effects of environmental hazards;

8.4.5  identification and management of clusters;

8.4.6  communications and working with the media;

8.4.7  risk assessment and risk communication;

8.4.8  interpretation and presentation of data;

8.4.9  advising professionals and the public.

 

8.5     By the end of the placement, registrars should have increased their knowledge of:

8.5.1   major health protection issues/key policies and guidelines;

8.5.2   how to keep up to date with health protection issues;

8.5.3   sources of advice for health protection issues.

 

8.6    It is acknowledged that it may not always be possible to achieve all of the above in the initial 3 months fulltime placement and registrars may need to extend or pursue further short-term placements subject to Training Programme Team’s agreement.

 

Meeting learning outcomes

9.1    Registrars will participate in the investigation and management of single cases of communicable diseases and outbreaks/incidents including chemical incidents, as well as attend relevant meetings.  Registrars will also be expected to complete a short health protection project during their placement which may contribute to meeting competences in other areas of the curriculum. APPENDIX 1 outlines Key Competence 6 learning outcomes and suitable assessment methods.  

9.2    Where direct experience cannot be achieved in the 3 months (e.g. outbreak management) specific tutorials, exercises or discussion and opportunities for extra placement time will be arranged to address these needs. Registrars will be offered the opportunity to shadow key staff, such as Consultants in Health Protection, Health Protection Practitioners, Environmental Health Officers, epidemiologists, information staff and microbiologists. This will be identified through the learning agreement between the registrar and the health protection placement supervisor. 

9.3    The summative assessment (Appendix 2 and 14.4) will be undertaken at the end of the placement to contribute to the assessment as to whether a registrar is deemed competent by the placement supervisor to be on-call for the PHE South West Centre health protection team. This assessment will also contribute as evidence to competences required. 

 

Working in the Acute Response Centre (ARC)

10.1    The ARC is the central point for the PHE response to notifications of cases of infection, incidents and enquiries. Enquiries are received from other professionals and the public on a wide range of health protection issues

10.2    The PHE South West Centre provides one acute response service over two offices in Bristol and Totnes, managed by a senior health protection practitioner and staffed by a team of practitioners, administrators and a duty consultant on a rota basis. 

10.3    Registrars will be briefed about local ARC arrangements. All registrars are expected to participate in acute response work at least three days per week (1.0wte) during their placement. The average registrar would need to spend between 50% and 75% (dependent on previous experience) of their placement working in acute response in order to gain the required competence and.  An equivalent period will be worked out for registrars working less than WTE on a pro rata basis.

10.4    During this period the registrar will be expected to respond to cases, incidents and enquiries working with the duty team. Registrars will never be expected to work alone and appropriate support and supervision will be provided. Registrars will always be supernumerary capacity and not used to cover practitioners or consultants during their time in the ARC.

10.5    Registrars should recognise the limits of their competence and be prepared to ask for advice and assistance. The duty consultant will be accessible to support and supervise the registrar and advice can also be sought from the health protection practitioners. When working in the ARC, registrars will also be expected to take part in daily Sit-rep meetings and other clinical review meetings as advised by their health protection placement supervisor.

10.6    Registrars who need to travel long distances to attend the ARC should discuss with their educational supervisor and, if necessary, the SW Public Health Training Programme Director to identify available support.

10.7    Before working in the ARC registrars will have:

10.7.1   had a structured induction;

10.7.2   have completed mandatory training in information governance and safeguarding;

10.7.3   become adequately familiar with the health protection team and office environment;

10.7.4   reviewed common previous enquiries with their health protection placement  supervisor or other nominated health protection specialist;

10.7.5   received basic training on HPZone (the Centre’s case/situation management system);

10.7.6   received information and instructions from their health protection placement supervisor or other members of the team on:

  • confidentiality;
  • documentation using HPZone;
  • use of standard questionnaires, e.g. for gastrointestinal disease and chemical incidents;
  • flow of information on notifications within the unit;
  • how to access resources including local and national policies and guidance;
  • how to access Standard Operating Procedures;
  • access to telephone numbers of key contacts, e.g. infection control teams, and Local Authority Environmental Health Officers etc...

 

10.8      When rostered to work in the ARC registrars will:

10.8.1   work under the supervision of the health protection duty team;

10.8.2   recognise and acknowledge limits to their competence;

10.8.3   offer to ring the caller back if unsure of the response and then discuss the response with a member of the duty team for the day or the duty Consultant;

10.8.4   follow PHE policy and standard operating procedures;

10.8.5   record information accurately and contemporaneously on HPZone.

 

10.9       After each day in the ARC registrars will:

10.9.1   review daily, the cases and enquiries with the duty Consultant or other nominated duty professional;

10.9.2   ensure that any follow-up required is undertaken or passed on to appropriate colleagues or the duty Consultant.  This is particularly important if the registrar will not be available later or the following day;

10.9.3   record in their training log the details and key learning points of cases, enquiries and issues dealt with;

10.9.4   identify learning points and issues, which require further discussion on a one to one basis with the placement supervisor or at the weekly clinical team meeting.

 

10.10    To meet outstanding competences registrars will be expected to be involved in the event of major incidents/outbreaks anywhere in neighbouring localities and should be informed of and invited to take part in incidents requiring mutual aid, or the response to incidents that would provide a good training opportunity.

 

Partnership  and proactive health protection work

11.1       Registrars will be offered the opportunity to attend scheduled meetings with local partners, together with consultant in health protection or practitioner.  The main aims of attendance for registrars are to develop an understanding of key issues, the role of the PHE in these contexts, the roles of a range of partners and how the PHE works with partners to strengthen the health protection system as a whole.   This will build on experience gained by the registrar in their other phase 1 placement and their progress against the checklist outlined in APPENDIX 5.

11.2       Examples of meetings may include routine partnership meetings such as Local Authority Health Protection Committees, Local Infection Control Committees, meetings with environmental health, local water companies and laboratories, port health, clinical strategy groups such as sexual health, blood-borne viruses; public health strategy groups such as immunisation and Emergency Planning such as Local Resilience Forum meetings.

11.3       There should be an opportunity to discuss the meetings with the CCDC or HPP to reflect on how they contribute to learning.

 

Project work

12.1       Registrars will be expected to undertake a health protection project during their placement. The projects chosen will be negotiated between the registrar and their health protection placement supervisor (and where appropriate the Educational Supervisor of the registrar) and should address gaps in competence. The health protection placement supervisor will oversee their project or in conjunction with another clinical supervisor who leads for the specialist area of the project. The project undertaken may contribute to meeting competences outside of section 6 in the 2015 curriculum.

 

Documenting learning experiences

13.1       A health protection logbook and summary sheet (for reflections on at least 5 significant cases/enquiries/situations managed) should be completed omitting confidential details.

13.2       The log and summary sheet should be discussed at one to one supervision sessions. The registrar should submit documentation at least 48 hours before the meeting time.

 

Assessment of competence to participate in the PHE South West Centre out of hours on call rota

14.1       Registrars seeking to start supervised out of hours on-call duties need to fulfil the following criteria before they can be assessed as competent for this role:

14.1.1   have passed Part A of the Faculty of Public Health membership;

14.1.2   have successfully completed their HPT placement and fully met competence against learning outcomes 1.2, 4.2, 6.1 - 6.6, and 9.2;

14.1.3   have successfully completed the summative assessment (Appendix 2);

14.1.4   have maintained (and continue to maintain) a log-book documenting cases and incidents experienced and reflecting on the events as a learning experience regularly with their placement supervisor;

14.1.5   have experienced, or received training in a range of common scenarios (APPENDIX 3).

 

14.2       Formative Assessment will be against performance criteria identified in the Faculty of Public Health Specialty Training Curriculum 2015 and the Skills for Health National Occupational Standards using the assessment pro-forma Appendix 1.

 

14.3       Methods of formative assessment will include:

14.3.1   direct observation;

14.3.2   case based discussion through log-book;

14.3.3   review of case documentation;

14.3.4   feed-back on performance including multi-source feedback.

 

14.4       Summative Assessment will be carried out by the assigned health protection placement supervisor and a senior health protection practitioner deemed by the Deputy Director of Health Protection as competent for this role and using the assessment pro-forma (Appendix 2).

 

14.5       The purpose of the summative assessment is to assess that the trainee:

14.5.1   understands the professional responsibilities of being on-call;

14.5.2   understands the local on-call procedures;

14.5.3   understands the roles and responsibilities of key Out Of Hours players;

14.5.4   has adequate theoretical knowledge of communicable diseases and environmental hazards to support the management of out of hours cases / incidents;

14.5.5   is able to ask appropriate questions and in sufficient detail to describe the problem;

14.5.6  knows where to find further resources and guidelines, and

14.5.7   is able to discuss the issue with the consultant on call to agree necessary public health action.

 

14.6       The trainee is not expected to manage the scenario at consultant level but to assist the consultant on call in effectively dealing with the query/scenario.

14.7       For the summative assessment three scenarios will be discussed, at least one of which will be a non-communicable disease.  Examples of the cases/ incidents that will be used to inform scenarios are presented in Appendix 3. The candidate will be asked to outline their response for the ‘out of hours’ management of the 3 case/incident scenarios and be given 45 minutes on their own to prepare for this. After 45 minutes, the candidate will report each plan back to the assessors who may ask subsidiary questions to clarify information presented. The candidate will have access to HPZone, internet access and other support materials they would have access to on call.

14.8       The outcome of the summative assessment will be provided by the assessors on the same day as the assessment. The summative assessment pro-forma (Appendix 2) including feedback will be completed by the assessors and given to the registrar within three working days following assessment.

14.9       Should a registrar fail their summative assessment, they will be supported to identify further learning needs over an agreed timeframe and arrangements will be made to re-assess with a different health protection placement supervisor and senior health protection practitioner.

14.10    Should they fail this second summative assessment, the health protection placement supervisor will meet with the registrar’s Educational Supervisor and specialty tutor to discuss this further and agree remedial action required where appropriate. This will be reported to the SW Public Health Training Programme Team for their agreement.

14.11    Having assessed an individual Specialty Registrar in Public Health and deemed them competent to undertake supervised out of hours on call duties, the health protection placement supervisor must inform the SW Public Health Programme Team Training Programme Director in writing with a provisional start date. The health protection placement supervisor will ensure that registrars are not rostered for on call duties until a start date has been agreed, otherwise there may be problems with payment.

 

Continued development of health protection competence post-placement

15.1       In order to achieve competence 6.9 (demonstrate competence to participate in an unsupervised out of hours on call rota) and further develop health protection competence, registrars will have to meet the following:

15.1.1   Undertake approximately 40 on call sessions as first responder and demonstrate a breadth of out of hours health protection activity and appropriate response through their log-book. A 24 hour weekend shift counts as 2 sessions (e.g. 9 am Saturday to 9am Sunday). This is a guide and breadth of activity and reflection of learning points supersedes quantity of on call undertaken;

15.1.2   worked in the ARC to further develop competence and meet learning needs at least 3 days per quarter / 1 day per month (but preferably in a block of 3 days);

15.1.3   demonstrated additional Continued Professional Development in health protection (e.g. attending on-call training days /  relevant conferences / contributing to or appraising and reporting on relevant papers);

15.1.4   maintained a reflective log-book and met with the health protection trainer at least twice per annum to review this over the period they are on call.

15.1.5   Completed the supplementary knows how and shows how check list whilst engaged in phase 1 and phase 2 placements (Appendix 5).

Arrangements for registrars undertaking supervised out of hours on call (with effect from 1st September 2016)

16.1       Specialty Registrars in Public Health who have completed their Health Protection rotation and assessed as competent will be invited to join the rota to be the first point of contact. A 1.0wte Specialty Registrar will be expected to complete 10 sessions of on call every three months. 80% of the on call allocation will be Saturday, Sunday or Bank Holidays as these are the days when they are most likely to handle calls to support learning. The remaining 20% will be allocated to week nights. One 24 hour period of on call will count as two on call sessions (e.g. 9am Saturday until 9am Sunday). For those working less than 1.0wte, the allocation will be proportionate to hours worked.

16.2       At these times, registrars on the rota will be the first point of contact for one of the three on call geographies:

16.2.1   Devon and Cornwall;

16.2.2   Somerset and Dorset

16.2.3   Avon Gloucestershire and Wiltshire.

 

16.3       As the PHE South West Centre delivers one acute response service over two sites, a registrar may be required to support any one of these geographies whilst on call regardless of their site of training.

16.4       PHE South West Centre will ensure all registrars have relevant contact information and access to the relevant geographies on HPZone.

16.5       For registrars who have not been provided with a mobile phone by their training location for work purposes, PHE will provide a mobile phone for the duration they are on the on call rota.  

16.6       Registrars will need to complete approximately 40 on call sessions and demonstrate through their log-book a good breadth of health protection activity and response in order for competency 6.9 to be signed off (see 15.1)

16.7       Support to the registrar will be provided by the practitioner tier as required and their work will be supervised by the consultant on call. This on-call tier for registrars should be considered supernumerary and is designed as a supported learning opportunity to achieve competency 6.9.

16.8       Feedback and discussion of any learning points observed for activity undertaken by the registrar should be provided at the earliest opportunity. If not during the on call shift, feedback should be provided with the following 24 hours.

16.9       Registrars will be expected to record and report on call activity undertaken to the health protection practitioner they are on call with in order to support handovers.

16.10     Where registrars have been involved in cases/situations over their out of hours on call shift, they will be expected to dial-in to the 9.30am health protection team Sit-Rep on the next working day.

16.11    Registrars are responsible for checking their own access to HPZone prior to commencing an on call shift.

16.12    Registrars on call will be remunerated as per current arrangements with the SW Public Health Training Programme Team. Once the registrar has achieved their health protection learning outcomes including 6.9, they will no longer be required to undertake health protection on call.

16.13    The following rules as outlined by the South West Deanery Public Health Training Programme Team following European Working Directives apply to registrars participating in the out of hours on call rota:

16.13.1  participation must not include any continuous duty periods of more than 32 hours on weekdays and 56 hours at weekends;

16.13.2  registrars will not be required to work more frequently than a 1:9 rota;

16.13.3  activity must be consistent with registrars working within their contracted hours;

16.13.4  in the case of a less than full time registrar their contribution must be proportionate to their hours of work i.e. if working 0.6wte they must have on-call duties equivalent to 60% of whole-time registrars;

16.13.5   registrars should also achieve a minimum of 5 hours continuous rest during the hours of 10pm and 8 am.

 

Placement Evaluation and quality assurance

17.1      As part of the pre-meeting, the health protection placement supervisor will advise the registrar that they are the first point of contact for discussions about the placement itself and will provide opportunities throughout the placement to discuss concerns or way to improve the placement experience. This will normally be considered during formal one to one supervision sessions (see Appendix 4) and will involve the Specialty Tutor if required.

17.2      At the end of the Phase 1 placement, the registrar will be asked to provide feedback on the placement as part of an exit meeting (although it is acknowledged that support and supervision will continue whilst the registrar is on the out of hours on call rota and in order to achieve remaining competences (namely 6.9).

17.3      The Specialty Tutor will also make contact with the registrar to ensure all relevant feedback is captured to inform future placements.

17.4      The Deputy Director of Health Protection will formally meet with members of the South West Deanery Public Health Training Team and registrar representative(s) quarterly to review health protection placements and ensure that the health protection training policy is being upheld and updated as required.

17.5      All health protection placement supervisors will remain fully accredited. Failure to do so will result in their being removed from the list of PHE accredited supervisors until such time that gaps in accreditation are met.

17.6      There will be a named PHE South West Centre Health Protection Specialty Tutor. This individual will participate in monthly Specialty Tutor meetings convened by the South Deanery Public Health Training Programme Team.

17.7      The Deputy Director of Health Protection will attend quarterly Regional Training Committee meetings and report on health protection training activity for the quarter.

17.8      PHE South West Centre are required to participate in the South West Deanery Quality Panel process and following the annual review meeting will maintain an action plan to address matters raised through this process. This will be monitored by the Deputy Director of Health Protection.  

APPENDIX 1 Guidance for methods of assessment for core health protection competences

 

 

Key Area 6: Health Protection

Suitable assessment  methods (Indicative)

 

Aim: To identify, assess and communicate risks associated with hazards relevant to health protection, and to lead and co-ordinate the appropriate public health response.

Target phase

Related Learning Outcome

 MFPH Exam

WPBA

 

 

 

 

Part A

Part B

DOP

WR

CBD

MSF

6.1

Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of hazards relevant to health protection.

1

 

X

 

X

X

X

 

6.2

Gather and analyse information, within an appropriate timescale, to identify and assess the risks of health protection hazards.

1

KA 1.3, 1.6

X

X

X

X

X

 

6.3

Identify, advise on and implement public health actions with reference to local, national and international policies and guidance to prevent, control and manage identified health protection hazards.

1

KA 2.3, 2.4 , KA 3 &KA 4

X

X

X

X

X

 

6.4

Understand and demonstrate the responsibility to act within one's own level of competence and understanding and know when and how to seek expert advice and support.

1

KA 9

 

X

X

X

X

 

6.5

Document information and actions with accuracy and clarity in an appropriate timeframe.

1

KA 1.2

   

X

X

   

6.6

Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the main stakeholders and agencies at a local, national and international level involved in health protection and their roles and responsibilities.

1

KA3

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

Key Area 6: Health Protection

Suitable assessment  methods (Indicative)

 

Aim: To identify, assess and communicate risks associated with hazards relevant to health protection, and to lead and co-ordinate the appropriate public health response.

Target phase

Related curriculum areas with overlap

 

 

WPBA

 

 

 

 

Part A

Part B

DOP

WR

CBD

MSF

6.7

Demonstrate an understanding of the steps involved in outbreak/incident investigation and management and be able to make a significant contribution to the health protection response.

Any

KA 1.6

X

X

X

X

X

 

6.8

Apply the principles of prevention in health protection work.

2

KA 1.9, 2.3, 2,5 & 5.9

X

X

X

X

X

 

6.9

Demonstrate competence to participate in an unsupervised out of hours (OOH) on call rota.

2

     

X

 

X

 
                       

WPBA – Work Place Based Assessment,  DOP – Directly Observed Practice, WR – Written Report, CBD – Case Based Discussion, MSF – Multi-source Feedback

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 2: Summative assessment pro-forma for supervised on-call – assessment criteria

Name of Candidate: ___________________________ Date of Assessment _________________

Name of Assessor 1 ___________________________ Placement Supervisor / Consultant in Health Protection

Name of Assessor 2 ___________________________ Senior Health Protection Practitioner

To pass the assessment for supervised on-call, the candidate must achieve an outcome of ‘Met’ for each domain.

Domain

Guidance on meeting requirement

Outcome (Met/Unmet)

Assessors comment

Assessment & confirmation of diagnosis details (based on information provided

-       Candidate makes an assessment about the information provided in order to inform risk assessment and further action required (e.g. source of information/limitations of information provided/ additional information required and where to get it.) 

 

 

Knowledge of subject & guidelines to use

-       Demonstrates enough knowledge of scenario subject area to inform risk assessment and required out of hours action.

-       Knows which guidance to refer to in order to inform risk assessment and required out of hours action.

 

-       Refers to and uses guidance where knowledge on subject area is limited.

 

 

Initial risk assessment

-       Can define the associated hazard and its potential and likelihood to cause further harm to the public’s health/environmental damage.

-       Can define the population at risk.

 

 

Communications: Who to inform and when

-       Understand the need to report upwards to appropriate on-call tier and who to ask advice and support from.

-       Is able to identify relevant key people / agencies with whom to communicate directly or via the relevant on-call tier.

 

 

Immediate actions: investigations & control measures required for out of hours response

-       Provides a comprehensive outline of the immediate actions/control measures to be taken out of hours.

-       Shows an understanding of the appropriate timescale to implement action/control measures required.

 

 

Follow-up work (for next working day)

-       Is able to outline additional follow-up action required ‘in-hours’ and how these should be recorded.

-       Is able to identify how to report and who to report additional actions require to.

 

 

NB Registrars may commence out-of-hours supervised on-call once they have successfully passed the FPH Part A examination and fully met learning outcomes 1.2, 4.2, 6.1 - 6.6, and 9.2 (the latter must be assessed in the health protection setting even if it has already been signed off in another placement) and successfully completed the summative assessment for on-call. 

 

Is the candidate assessed as competent for supervised on-call Yes or No: _______________

 

Signed: (Assessor 1- Placement Supervisor / Consultant) _______________________Date:______

 

Signed: (Assessor 2 – Lead Health Protection Practitioner) ______________________Date:______

 

 

 

APPENDIX 3 – Examples of summative assessment scenarios

 

 

Examples of communicable disease scenarios, single cases of:

Examples of environmental incident scenarios:

Meningococcal disease or meningitis

Water incident, e.g. contaminated water supply

E coli O157

Fire involving asbestos

Legionella

 

Measles

 

Diphtheria

 

Hepatitis A

 

Acute Hepatitis B

 

Inoculation injury

 

Invasive Group A Strep

 

Contact with rash during pregnancy

 

Animal bite, e.g. dog or bat

 

Outbreak of diarrhoea and vomiting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 4 Supervision Pro-forma

 

Date:                          

Supervisee:                                                                                        

Supervisor:

 

Agenda

1)    General Placement Issues / observations

 

 

2)    Acute Response Work & Case/Enquiry/Situation Review

 

 

3)    Project update

 

 

4)    E-portfolio / sign off

 

 

5)    AOB

 

 

 

 

Signed: Supervisee: ___________________________/Date: ______                                                         

 

Signed Supervisor: ____________________________/Date: ______

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 5 – A ‘knows-how’ and ‘shows-how’ checklist to support Specialty Registrars in Public Health to develop a wider knowledge of the system of health protection (and show how this knowledge has been applied)

This checklist has been designed to aid Specialty Registrars in Public Health and their Educational Supervisors to maximise opportunities to understand (and demonstrate their understanding) of the system of health protection in the current health economy. It may provide further evidence of competence for Key Area 6 (and other relevant areas in the 2015 curriculum). This checklist should be completed before the end of Phase 2 and will be used to inform sign-off of competence 6.9 ‘demonstrate competence to participate in an unsupervised out of hours (OOH) on call rota’ It also outlines opportunities for how StRs can complete this checklist.


1.1 Health protection is a fundamental tenet of public health delivery at local, national and international levels. Therefore every educational /project supervisor has a role to play in supporting registrars to understand and improve their knowledge of the health protection system and relevant opportunities for them to show this understanding throughout their training.


1.2 Health protection training should start at the beginning of training at induction into the programme, through induction to Local Authority placements, formal teaching through the MPH/MSc as well as Part A preparation. Opportunities to understand the role of their host agencies in a system of health protection should be made at the earliest and where appropriate, specific project work agreed to enable StRs to apply knowledge acquired.


1.3 Additional training in this area will further enhance the current PHE placement. The three to five month health protection placement and associated project work will remain protected time to cover placement specific outcomes of Key Area 6.

Know How Check list

Proposed Additional 'Knows How'

Achieved by .....                                                    

Civil Contingencies Act 2004 and duties

of Category 1 and 2 organisations                     

  • Introduction to EPRR - PHE short  course/tutorial 
  • Self-directed study
  • Induction to placements 

Role and functions of Public Protection/

Environmental Health Teams within 

Local Authorities

  • Induction to placements
  • Project work
  • Self-directed study                                          

Role and functions of Civil Protection

Teams within Local Authorities

  • Induction to placements
  • Project work
  • Self-directed study

Role of Director of Public Health in 

discharging their responsibilities under 

the Health and Social Care Act 2012

  • Induction to placements

Functions/Terms of Reference of the 

Local Resilience Forum and Local 

Health Resilience Partnership

  • Self-directed learning
  • Meeting attendance

Risk assessment process in relation to 

emergencies including knowledge of the

Community and National Risk Registers

and hazard identification.

  • Introduction to EPRR - PHE short course/tutorial
  • Self-directed learning

Range of emergency plans at LRF/Local

Authority level and the 'planning cycle'

in the context of EPRR.

  • Induction to placements
  • Project work

Organisation Business Continuity Plans/

Planning including assessment and delivery 

of business critical functions.

  • Induction to placements
  • Project work
  • Self-directed study

Risk communication in an EPRR context and

wider communication strategies (eg. warn,

inform and advise approaches).

  • Introduction to EPRR - PHE short course/tutorial
  • Self-directed learning
  • Exercise participation
  • PHE Health Protection placement

Command and control arrangements

including strategic, tactical and operational

levels, their functions and how they are 

coordinated.

  • Introduction to EPRR - PHE short course/tutorial
  • Self-directed learning
  • Exercise participation

Role/functions of the Scientific Technical 

Advisory Cell (STAC)

  • STAC Members Training - PHE short course
  • Self-directed learning
  • Exercise participation

Role/functions of Local Authorities in leading

the recovery arrangements following response.

  • Induction to placements
  • Introduction to EPRR - PHE short course/tutorial
  • Exercise participation
  • Self-directed learning

Role/functions of agencies who will be involved

in response and recovery following an incident

eg.Environment Agency, Food Standards Agency, Animal

& Plant Health Agency

  • Introduction to EPRR - PHE short course/tutorial
  • STAC members training - PHE short course
  • Health Protection placement induction/placement

Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Programme

and Joint Decision Model.

  • Introduction to EPRR -  PHE short course/tutorial
  • STAC members training - PHE short course
  • Exercise participation
Incident declaration and escalation process
  • Introduction to EPRR - PHE short course/tutorial
  • STAC members training - PHE short course
  • Induction to placements

The functions of the air quality cell in support of an 

incident and sampling of other materials (eg. water/food)

to inform a risk assessment.

  • Local Authority/PHE induction and placements/project work
  • Participation in exercises
  • Self-directed learning/agency visits                                   

Environmental health roles,  responsibilities,

legislation, regulations, investigation, enforcement etc. 

  •  Local Authority/PHE induction and placements project work  

Air quality and environmental protections, including 

land contamination etc. and links to LA planning role

  •  Local Authority/PHE induction and placements/project work
  •  Participation in exercises
  •  Self-directed learning/agency visits

Arrangements for commissioning and provision of 

immunisation and vaccination programmes and 

assurance that locally identified needs are met

  •  Local Authority/PHE induction and placements;project work
  •  Visit to SCRIMS team
  •  Self-directed learning/agency visits

Health Overview and Scrutiny in relation to health

protection

  •  Local Authority Placement

Routine surveillance systems used in the context of health 

protection

  •  Local Authority Placement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Show How Checklist

 

Proposed Additional 'Show How'          Achieved by .......                                   Example of Linked Learning Objectives                  

Contribute to the development of an 

emergency or business continuity

plan (eg. preparing, exercising or reviewing)

within the Local Authority.

  • Local Authority placement.
  • Core offer to CCG.
  • 6.1
  • 6.7
  • 6.8

Participate and reflect on a live major 

incident OR emergency planning exercise

and debrief at either tactical/strategic level.

  • Local Authority or PHE placement
  • 6.1
  • 6.2
  • 6.3
  • 6.4
  • 6.5
  • 6.6
  • 6.7

Attend a Local Resilience Forum/Local 

Health Resilience Partnership meeting and 

reflect through case based discussion/reflective

summary

  • Local Authority or PHE placement
  • 6.6

Complete a risk assessment / review an 

existing risk assessment on the Community

Risk Register ensuring local context for the 

risk is clearly outlined.

  • Local Authority or PHE placement
  • 6.2
  • 6.3

Undertake dynamic risk assessment during

incidents, emergencies and outbreaks to 

guide appropriate public health action

  • Local Authority or PHE placement
  • 6.2
  • 6.3

Use routine surveillance systems in relation

to answer a health protection query/question

  • Local Authority or PHE placement
  • 1.1
  • 1.3
  • 1.5

Undertake at least one collaborative project

with the Environmental Health/Public Protection

team

  • Local Authority placement
  • 4.8
  • 6.6

 

 

Useful Supporting Reference Materials


Cabinet Office. 2013. HM Government Emergency Response and Recovery – Non statutory guidance accompanying the Civil Contingencies Act 2004. Cabinet Office.

Cabinet Office. 2013. Expectations and Indicators of Good Practice Set for Category 1 and 2 Responders. Cabinet Office.


Cabinet Office. 2013. The Role of Local Resilience Forums: A Reference Document. The Civil Contingencies Act (2004), its associated Regulations (2005) and guidance, the National Resilience Capabilities Programme and emergency response and recovery. Civil Contingences Secretariat.


Civil Contingencies Act 2004, Chapter 36. London: The Stationary Office.


Department of Health. 2010. Health Protection Legislation (England) Guidance 2010. Department of Health.


Health and Safety Executive. 2016. Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 [Online]. Available at: http://www.hse.gov.uk/legislation/hswa.htm [Accessed 2 May 2016].


JESIP Website http://www.jesip.org.uk/home


NHS England. 2015. NHS England Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response Framework. NHS England National Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response Unit.


NHS England. 2015. NHS England Core Standards for Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response. NHS England

 

 

 

APPENDIX 6 - Guide for PHE staff and registrars carrying out health protection duties out of hours: Storing and transporting PII and confidential information off site


Purpose

  • to provide guidance on the storage and transport of confidential information or Person Identifiable Information (PII) for PHE staff and registrars working off-site and out-of-hours;
  • To ensure the safety of confidential and person identifiable information.

Background

PHE Health Protection staff and registrars are required to undertake out-of-hours health protection duties, working away from the office. Information, including PII may need to be written down on paper, either at home or occasionally in transit before being transcribed into HPZone. There may also be occasions where IT systems fail, and transcribing into HPZone is not immediately possible.

Legal requirements

All employees have a legal duty of confidentiality to keep PII and confidential information private, and not to divulge information accidentally.


PHE’s Records Management Guidance states that all individuals who work for PHE are responsible for any records which they create or use in the performance of their duties. All records created by a member of PHE staff belong to PHE.


The Data Protection Act 1998 requires personal data to be protected against unauthorised or unlawful processing and accidental loss, destruction or damage. There are a number of other statutory provisions which limit or prohibit the use of confidential information, and which require information to be shared.


The Caldicott Principles set out the principles under which information should be shared:

1. justify the purpose;
2. don’t use PII unless absolutely necessary;
3. use the minimum necessary PII;
4. access to PII should be on a strict need to know basis;
5. everyone should be aware of their responsibilities;
6. understand and comply with the law.

Guidance

The following are guidelines, which should safeguard PII and confidential information in most circumstances. However, circumstances vary and may require different actions, but PHE staff and registrars should always follow the principles of safeguarding confidential and PII data.

Working outside PHE offices

PII and confidential information (both paper and electronic formats) should be kept under constant control, so that other people cannot see the content or have access to the information.

Storage

If paper records are generated during periods of on call they should be stored out of sight, preferably in a locked draw or filing cabinet. Other members of the household or friends/family must not be able to see the content or have access to the information. Completed paper questionnaires, or other paper notes should be entered onto HPZone as soon as possible, and then securely destroyed e.g. by securely transporting to the usual workplace and placing in confidential waste bins. This assumes that the place of work has sufficiently robust confidential waste disposal processes in place, if unsure ask you Educational Supervisor at the placement. Once information is transferred to HPZone these entries are considered the primary record and the paper notes can be destroyed.

Notebooks and paper used for in-office ARC days should be stored in a designated lockable cupboard. Notebooks and paper should therefore not need to be routinely transported.

Transporting PII or Confidential Information

If PHE staff and registrars need to travel with PII or confidential information they have personal responsibility to ensure the information is kept secure and confidential.

PII or confidential information must be kept out of sight whilst being transported. Paper records should be placed in a sealed non-transparent container e.g. windowless envelope marked ‘confidential’ prior to being transported.

Notebooks or paper records (securely packaged) should be kept under the constant control of the employee while in transit. When travelling by car paper records should always be locked in the boot. When travelling by public transport the records must be kept on the person at all times. No PII or confidential information must be left unattended.

Paper records should not be opened or reviewed while travelling on public transport or in public places.

Computers, laptops and phones

PHE laptops are password protected and encrypted. In general PHE staff and registrars must not store person identifiable or confidential information on a personal computer or device – if necessary it should be stored on a network drive.

If at all possible case information should be recorded directly onto HPZone. Only in exceptional circumstances should case information be recorded directly onto the local hard drive of a PHE or personal laptop or other device, if this does occur this information should be deleted immediately after it has been transferred onto HPZone. Where non-PHE laptops or devices are used to record case information, file destruction software such as ZDelete should be used to ensure this information is securely deleted. Any case information backed-up to a non-PHE Cloud service or removable storage device (such as a personal USB memory stick or external hard drive) must also be securely deleted.

When working on a laptop or other devise PHE staff must ensure that the screen cannot be seen by anyone else. Personal information should never be viewed on a laptop or phone screen while travelling on public transport.

An unattended computer must be screen locked.

PHE staff and registrars must not send PII or confidential information to a personal e-mail account. PII or confidential information may be sent between PHE e mail accounts but not to nhs.net accounts from a PHE account. If it is necessary to send or receive PII from NHS colleagues (nhs.net to nhs.net accounts) enquire about using an nhs.net account that each health protection team may have access to. Separate local arrangements may be in place to transfer PII to local authority colleagues, please enquire about these arrangements if in doubt.

Accessing HPZone out of Hours

All directly employed PHE staff should be able to access PHE systems and HPZone via their encrypted PHE laptop out of hours using the Aruba Virtual Internet Access (VIA) application. Many on call registrars are not issued with a PHE laptop and therefore have to use their own personal computers. If this is the case then HPZone should be accessed using the secure remote access method called Citrix, where the user is authenticated by PHE systems with a unique randomised PIN number provided by PINsafe.

Staff who need a PINsafe & Citrix account to gain remote access to HPZone will require:

1. an existing PHE email account authorised by a line manager using the normal ICT process;
2. an approved HPZone account approved by the Centre Director or Deputy Director using the normal CIMS team process;
3. complete the on-line application form provided by ICT and submit it to the remote access team through the ICT helpdesk. The application form and PINsafe guidance notes can be found on PHEnet using this link: http://phenet.phe.gov.uk/Resources/IT/Pages/Accessing-IT-systems-remotely.aspx.


Memory Sticks

Only memory sticks encrypted to the AES-256 standard should be used by all staff.

Only in exceptional circumstances should case information be recorded on a memory stick, if this does occur this information should be deleted immediately after it has been used or transferred onto HPZone. Suitable encrypted memory sticks are available from the HPT business support team.

Phone calls

If PHE staff or registrars receive an out-of-hours call in transit on public transport, they should assess the urgency of the call and take essential details without breaching confidentiality i.e. not mentioning people’s names etc. while on public transport. Based on this assessment a decision can be made regarding the urgency
with which the call needs to be followed up. If necessary it may be appropriate to pass the call to another member of the on call team who is in a more suitable position to deal with it or follow up may be delayed until the journey is complete and the member of staff is in a more suitable environment to deal with it.

Registrar Training Competencies

Confidentiality is covered under competencies 1.2 and 9.10 in the 2015 training curriculum for SpRs.The full curriculum is available here: http://www.fph.org.uk/curriculum_2015

Registrar Log Books

Registrars are required to keep an On Call Logbook.

The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges provides the following advice on how logbooks and reflective notes should be anonymised:

Other practitioners, patients, parents and staff should not be named or be readily identifiable from the information you provide. For example, instead of referring to patient Jane Smith, refer to them as patient X. Never include the patient ID number or name. Avoid including date of birth (if necessary refer to the patient’s approximate age), addresses or any unique condition or circumstance of that patient which may allow someone to identify them when used in conjunction with other information they have access to. Occasionally it will be unavoidable as the condition of a particular patient will be unique, but try and minimise the patient identifiable information that you provide.
http://www.aomrc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Academy_Guidance_on_e-Portfolios_201916-5.pdf

Educational Supervisors

Educational Supervisors should:

  • ensure that registrars are aware of their obligations to keep PII and confidential information safe as outlined in this document;
  • ensure that registrars have under taken the appropriate information governance training including their annual update;
  • Check their registrar’s logbook to ensure information has been appropriately anonymised.